Tenable (adjective)

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Definitions:
1 able to be maintained or defended against attack or objection. 2 (of a post, grant, etc.) able to be held or used for a specified period:

Synonyms:
reasonable, believable, credible

Antonyms:
unbelievable, unreasonable, irrational

Examples:
– Frank’s statement that gas-guzzling cars do not affect the environment is not very tenable.
– Most of Albert Einstein’s theories have proven tenable over time.
– His theory is no longer tenable in light of the recent discoveries.
– The soldiers’ encampment on the open plain was not tenable, so they retreated to higher ground

Proclivity (noun)

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Definitions:
a natural inclination or tendency to behave in a certain way, often objectionable or immoral
noun (pl. proclivities) a tendency to do or choose something regularly; an inclination or predisposition.

Synonyms:
inclination, predisposition, propensity,

Antonyms:
distaste

Examples:
– The golfer finally admitted his mistakes and his proclivity for shapely blondes
– Frank will not succeed unless he can overcome his proclivity for laziness.
– John’s proclivity for lying borders on pathological.
– He had a proclivity for collecting rare stamps.

Supercillious (adjective)

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Definitions:
1. showing haughty superiority over someone else; 2. characterized by or expressive of contempt, Feeling or showing haughty disdain, full of contempt and arrogance.

Synonyms:
disdainful, contemptuous, arrogant, bossy,

Antonyms:
humble, courteous, friendly

Examples:
– The CEO spoke in a supercilious tone that was patronizing to everyone in the company.
– The supercilious smugness of the movie-star was off-putting.
– the supercilious bus driver made Laura feel like an idiot because sheʼd lost her bus pass
– The supermodel at the party looked at those around her with a supercilious air.

Precursor (verb/noun)

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Definitions:
One that precedes and indicates, suggests, or announces someone or something to come:
One that precedes another; a forerunner or predecessor

Synonyms:
forerunner, predecessor, originator

Antonyms:
follower

Examples:
– During a precursory inspection of the house, Donald failed to notice many or its problems.
– The precursor to Bitcoin’s Lightning Network was slower and and less efficient.
– Our new business model is much more streamlined and efficient, compared to its precursor.
– After his precursory statements outlining the project, we got into the heart of the meeting.

Shunt (verb/noun)

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Definitions:
1 slowly push or pull (a railway vehicle or vehicles) so as to make up or remove from a train.
2 push or shove.
3 direct or divert to a less important place or position.

Synonyms:
(n.) swift, interchange, (v.) rearrange, divert,

Examples:
– After the accident, they needed to shunt the train so that another train could pass again.
– If Frank thinks he can just shunt the problems onto somebody else, he’d better think again.
– The plan is to shunt water from the lake into the river.
– During the first few weeks at my new job, I was shunted from one desk to another because my office was still occupied by someone else.

Irrelevant (adjective)

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Definitions:
1. not important; 2. not related to what is being considered or discussed, not having anything to do with the matter at hand

Synonyms:
immaterial, unnecessary, unimportant,

Antonyms:
connected, relevant, essential

Examples:
– We were talking about baseball, so Lisa’s comment about Michael Jordan was completely irrelevant.
– The documentation Marc presented was irrelevant as it had no connection to this case.
– Some people believe that the US Dollar may simply fade into irrelevance when the whole world will adopt crypto currencies.

Rapport (noun)

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Definitions:
Relationship, especially one of mutual trust or emotional affinity.
An emotional bond or friendly relationship or a sense that they understand and share each other’s concerns.

Synonyms:
understanding, agreement, bond, relationship

Antonyms:
disagreement, friction, discord

Examples:
– Dwight Schrute needed to build rapport with his coworkers in order to succeed in the company.
– Even though Jim and Dwight have been colleagues for a while, They’ve never had the kind of rapport that would make them good friends.
– Marc’s good rapport with his students was one of the reasons why the school board named him Teacher of the Year

Inure (verb)

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Definitions:
1. to become used to something unpleasant by repeated experiences with it; 2. to become effective or come into use or operation

Synonyms:
adapt, accustom, habituate, familiarize,

Examples:
– Hollywood celebrities must eventually become inured to the lack of privacy.
– After spending weeks in the Sahara desert, Luke was inured to the heat.
– At first Simona thought she was going to become claustrophobic, but eventually she became inured to the cramped cubicle at her new job.
– After spending some time in military, the new recruits became inured to the hardships.

Virulent (Adjective)

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Definitions:
1. very poisonous: extremely poisonous, infectious, or damaging to organisms
2. malicious: showing great bitterness, malice, or hostility

Synonyms:
poisonous, deadly, venomous, malignant,

Antonyms:
innocuous, friendly

Examples:
– However, a scientist in New York was successful in creating a vaccine for the highly virulent strain this disease.
– The virulent look on Lisa’s face warned me that she was about to be unkind,
– Chandler’s virulent comments were obviously said to hurt Monica.
– Frank’s virulent attitude toward hard work doesn’t make it easy for him to keep a job for very long.

Stanza (noun)

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Definitions:
a group of lines forming the basic recurring metrical unit in a poem; a verse. Lines of poetry that form a unit

Synonyms:
composition, arrangement, unit, piece,

Examples:
– John had the poem If by Rudyard Kipling memorized, except for the last stanza.
– Nelson Mandela’s favorite poem was Invictus by William Ernest Henley and he especially liked the final stanza of the poem.
– Charles Bukowski never broke his poems into stanzas until he had finished writing them.