Misogynist (noun)

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Definitions:
a man who hates women, 2. reflecting or inspired by a hatred of women

Synonyms:
pester

Examples:
He apparently deserved his reputation as a misogynist – She left the Church because of its misogynist teachings on women and their position in society. – There’s a disturbing misogyny in his films.

Surrogate (noun, ,, adjective)

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Definitions:
(n.) 1. a person who acts in place of another, especially in an official capacity; 2. something that takes the place of another; (adj.) taking the place of something

Synonyms:
fill-in, substituting, replacement, alternate

Antonyms:
permanent, original

Examples:
– When the President cannot make it to an engagement, the Vice President often serves as his surrogate. – Preschool teachers serve as a surrogate family while the children’s parents are at work. – Because the couple cannot have children of their own, they will look for a suitable surrogate mother. – Because she is afraid to fly, reading books about far-away destinations serves as surrogate travel for her

Tips:
Surrogate is derived from the Latin surrogare, which means “to substitute.” Surrogate can be used as both a noun and an adjective to refer to someone who takes the place of someone else. “Surrogate mother” is a common phrase used to describe a woman who carries another woman’s baby through preagnancy.

Insurgency (noun)

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Definitions:
an organized rebellion aimed at overthrowing a government, organization, or leadership

Synonyms:
rebellion, uprising

Antonyms:
cooperation

Examples:
– Many businesses are afraid to invest in the country while the rebel insurgency is underway. ( – An employee insurgency aimed at ousting executive management erupted when the management announced another pay freeze. – The guards were finally able to contain the insurgency among prisoners, after several hours of fighting. – The government is growing increasingly concerned about the escalating insurgency in that country.

Tips:
An insurgency essentially aims to take power away from those in control. One often hears this term on the news during times of war. An insurgent is a rebel, someone involved in the insurgency.

Delineate (verb)

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Definitions:
1. to describe, portray, or list in detail; 2. to indicate the physical boundaries of something

Synonyms:
portray, represent

Examples:
– The Chairman’s memo delineates the necessary steps we’ll need to take before the merger can take place. – Barbed wire fences delineate the boundaries of each farmer’s territory. – She delineated a plan of action so that everyone would know his or her respective role in the project. – The setting for the story is beautifully delineated in the first chapter.

Tips:
Delineate comes from the Latin word delineare, “to sketch out,” originally from the root linea, “line.” Delineate carries the connotation that a description or depiction is detailed and lays out the boundaries of something (“delineates the problem”). In business, delineate is often used as a more powerful way of saying “describe in detail” or “separate.”

Purport (verb and noun)

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Definitions:
1. To present, especially deliberately, the appearance of being; profess or claim, often falsely. 2. To convey to the mind as the meaning or thing intended; express or imply.

Synonyms:
mean, intend, signify, implication

Antonyms:
exterior, insignificance, meaninglessness, outside, surface

Examples:
I wish you would consent to give me their purport by word of mouth. What was the purport of their conversation no one ever knew.

Stoop (adjective)

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Synonyms:
lower, incline, lean over/down

Examples:
I won’t stoop to copying, even if it means I’ll flunk – I’m a desperate woman but I wouldn’t stoop to blackmail. – No reputable company would stoop to selling the names of their clients to other companies. – He’s over six feet tall, but the way he stoops makes him look shorter. – Something fell out of her coat pocket and she stooped down and picked it up.

Guesstimate (noun and verb (informal))

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Definitions:
1. noun: An estimate based on a mixture of guesswork and calculation. 2. verb: Estimate (something) using a mixture of guesswork and calculation.

Synonyms:
basically, essentially nearly, practically around

Antonyms:
balance, unblemished take account of, keep tabs

Examples:
Can you give a guesstimate of how much it will cost to fix my car? The answer to that would take a supercomputer quite a few days to work out and even then it would still be a ballpoint guesstimate.

Origins:
1902, a blending of guess (v) and estimate. Related: guesstimated, guesstimating. As a noun from, 1906.

Emolument (noun)

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Definitions:
1. The returns arising from office or employment usually in the form of compensation or perquisites. 2. Archaic: advantage

Synonyms:
compensatio, pay, profit

Antonyms:
loss

Examples:
The Emperor was not only the fountain of all honor, but of all emolument and place. They were surprised to find that the emolument was so trifling.

Origins:
Late Middle English: From Latin emolumentum, originally probably ‘ payment to a miller for grinding corn’, from emolere ‘grind up’ from e- (variant of ex), (out thoroughly) + molere ‘grind’

Apprehensive (adjective )

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Definitions:
1. Uneasy or fearful about something that might happen. 2. Quick to learn or understand. 3. Perceptive, discerning (usually followed by of)

Synonyms:
afraid, concerned, doubtful, jittery, jumpy, suspicious

Antonyms:
calm, certain, clear, collected, composed, confident

Examples:
I received the deputation with a trembling and apprehensive heart. They are apprehensive that Mr. Lovelace will be there with design to come home with me.

Origins:
Late Middle English: (in sense 2): From French apprehensifor medieval Latin apprehensivus, from Latin apprehendere ‘seize, grasp.

Relent (verb )

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Definitions:
1. To soften in feeling, temper, or determination; become more mild, compassionate, or forgiving. 2. To become less severe; slacken.

Synonyms:
capitulate, cave in, come around, comply

Antonyms:
grow, increase, worry, advance, ascend

Examples:
Your mother is of opinion, you say, that at last my friends will relent. Wanhope had the effect of appealing to Minver, but the painter would not relent.

Origins:
Late middle English (in the sense ‘dissolve, melt’): based on Latin re- ‘back’ + “lentare” ‘to bend’ (from lentus, ‘flexible’)