Laggard (noun)

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Definitions:
something or someone who lags or takes a long time to do something; (adj.) 1. reluctant and tending to get left behind; 2. tending to waste time

Synonyms:
procrastinator, reluctant, lazy, slowpoke, sluggish

Antonyms:
quick, diligent

Examples:
– The laggard legislators could not get the budget together. – I bet on the horse that was the favorite, but he ended up being a laggard in the race. – My brother-in-law is a laggard and always makes everyone wait for him. – My laggard co-worker has made us late to every meeting we’ve attended together.

Tips:
Think of the related verb lag, which means “to fall behind.” A laggard is someone who has fallen behind. Laggard is often used in business to describe underperforming stock.

Spillover (noun)

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Definitions:
an instance of overflowing or spreading into another area.

Examples:
– The TV series created spillover interest in the Civil War. – The conflict threatens to spill over into neighboring regions. – there has been a spillover into public schools of the ethos of private schools. – the village was a spillover from a neighboring, larger village.

Tips:
if a bad situation or problem spills over, it begins to have an unpleasant effect on another situation or group of people.

Unequivocal (adjective)

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Definitions:
clear and definite, allowing no doubt or confusion

Synonyms:
definite, indisputable

Antonyms:
ambiguous, questionable

Examples:
– When delegating tasks and giving out orders, it is important to use unequivocal terms so that no one is confused. – The senator gave his unequivocal support for the proposal. – John unequivocally denied the accusations against him. – It’s hard to find a politician who will give an unequivocal answer that clearly and definitively answers a question.

Tips:
The root word equivocal comes from Late Latin aequivocare, which means “ambiguous.” Therefore, when you add the negative un-, “not,” unequivocal refers to things that are not ambiguous, but clear and definitive. The adverb unequivocally usually refers to answering a question clearly, without any ambiguity.

Mantra (noun)

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Definitions:
commonly repeated word or phrase

Synonyms:
hymn, chant

Examples:
– Her personal mantra was “never give up.” – Repeating a mantra during meditation may lead to enhanced relaxation. – I have a lot of work to accomplish, so my mantra for today is “focus, focus, focus.” – Our company mantra is: “The customer is always right.”

Tips:
Originally, a mystical formula for meditation, today, mantra is a verbal formula associated with positive thinking. In business, a mantra usually represents a company’s or person’s saying or belief.

Hefty (adjective)

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Definitions:
large in amount or size

Synonyms:
burly, sturdy, hard, violent, forceful

Antonyms:
paltry

Examples:
Her salary will go up by a hefty 10%. – Lisa’s mom is a hefty woman with dyed blond hair – I am so hungry – I will order a hefty steak. – The police gave me a hefty fine.

Analogy (noun)

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Definitions:
unwillingness to change or bend

Synonyms:
similarity, correspondence, resemblance, relation, correlation, parallel

Antonyms:
dissimilarity

Examples:
The operation of a computer presents and interesting analogy to the working of the brain, In arguing against welfare, he used the analogy of feeding a wolf and making it dependent., Forcing him to retire is analogous to murdering him., The experience of mystic trance is in a sense analogous to sleep or drunkenness. – He drew an analogy between the brain and a vast computer.

Douse (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) 1. undisguised: shamelessly undisguised 2. with bare face: with an uncovered or clean-shaven face

Synonyms:
saturate, splash

Examples:
We had to douse the campfire before leaving in the morning – Efforts to douse the fire were hampered by high winds. – The rains doused the tourists strolling the town streets – We doused the drapes in water to remove dust – They doused him with gasoline and set him on fire.

Foible (noun)

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Definitions:
1. a slight flaw or failing of character that is a harmless, but slight weakness; 2. the weakest part of a fencing sword blade from the middle to the point

Examples:
– He overcame his foible of chronic tardiness by reminding himself not to be selfish with other people’s time. – The foible portion of the fencing sword blade is weaker, but has more agility and speed. – Interrupting people while they are speaking is probably his greatest foible. – His greatest driving foible is that he refuses to use his turn-signal before changing lanes.

Tips:
A foible is a behavioral attribute that is distinctive and peculiar to the individual, a foolish habit. In fencing, the foible is the weakest part of the sword, the easiest part of the sword to break. Foible is used to describe a person’s faults and weaknesses as well. We all have our foibles. A good way to temper gossip or criticism is to remind people that everyone has their foible (week point).

Impenetrable (adjective)

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Definitions:
impossible to enter or go through, impossible to enter.

Synonyms:
impervious, indestructible, impermeable

Antonyms:
clear, accessible

Examples:
Outside, the fog was thick and impenetrable. – Some of the lyrics on their latest album are completely impenetrable. – If language is described as impenetrable, it is impossible to understand: – Too many scholarly books are written in an impenetrable jargon.

Parochial (adjective)

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Definitions:
1. belonging to or related to a parish; 2. having a narrow or limited point of view

Synonyms:
religious, sectarian, limited, narrow-minded, conservative, dogmatic

Antonyms:
non-religious, free-thinking, open-minded

Examples:
– Lisa went to parochial school while all her friends went to a public one. – Some parents removed their children from a public school and enrolled them in a parochial school. – Lisa’s parochial views frustrated her liberal, free-thinking friend. – His parochial upbringing caused him to have a limited view of how a society should behave.

Tips:
Parochial is derived from the Late Latin parochialis, “of a parish.” Parochial is often used to describe religious schools or schools of a religious parish. Parochial has come to also mean “narrow-minded,” perhaps out of a stereotype that developed over time, characterizing members of the parish.