Kilter (noun)

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Definitions:
= Good working order or condition. OUT OF KILTER = out of harmony or balance.

Synonyms:
awry, muddled, out of order

Examples:
– A further tax increase on cigarettes would put Britain out of kilter with the rest of Europe. – Even one sleepless night can throw your body out of kilter. – Daylight savings throws everybody’s body clock out of kilter. – The jet lag has left me completely out of kilter

Temerity (noun)

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Definitions:
boldness with a reckless disregard for danger

Examples:
– No one could believe Lisa had the temerity to ask her parents for a new car after she had wrecked the old one. – I didn’t have the temerity to ask Marc why he and his wife had divorced. – If Rosa Parks had not had the temerity to stand up for what she believed in, the civil rights movement might not have been the same. – Frank has a temerarious nature and doesn’t mind shocking or offending people as long as he can say what’s on his mind.

Tips:
Temerity is derived from the Latin temeritatem, which means “rashness.” Temerity is synonymous with audacity. Both words mean “boldness.” Temerity is boldness from reckless confidence, while audacity is boldness from questioning or challenging assumptions or conventions. The related adjective temerarious describes someone who is boldly daring or brash.

Engulf (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) To surround or to cover something completely. Or to affect you very strongly.

Examples:
– At the ceremony, Joanne’s parents were engulfed with emotion. – The rising tide will soon engulf the small island. – Anarchy engulfed the nation after the dictator was removed from power. – As soon as Marc stepped out of the limo, he was engulfed by crazed students.

Tips:
Since a gulf is a body of water, engulf can be remembered as the action of a flood that covers, surrounds, or overwhelms. Think of any situation where you are, all of a sudden, engulfed (overwhelmed, swallowed) by something. Newspapers often use this word as it succinctly conveys drama.

Spat (noun)

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Definitions:
a short argument or disagreement about something unimportant, to quarrel briefly over a minor thing.

Synonyms:
minor argument, quarrel

Examples:
– Lisa was having a spat with her brother about who did the washing up. – This was a spat, not a serious fight.

Ham-fisted (adjective – British informal)

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Definitions:
Lacking skill in the physical movement, especially with the hands. Clumsy, inept, or heavy handed.

Synonyms:
awkward, butterfingered, clumsy, graceless

Antonyms:
expert, masterly, skilled, skillfull

Examples:
That’s a ham-fisted paint job if I ever saw one! That represents a ham-fisted attempt. The report criticizes the ham-fisted way in which complaints were dealt with.

Ironclad (adjective)

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Definitions:
1. sheathed in iron armor – used especially of naval vessels. 2. So firm or secure as to be unbreakable: such as a: binding- an ironclad oath b: having no obvious weakness – an ironclad case against the defendant

Synonyms:
abiding, definite, inflexible unwavering, firm

Antonyms:
flexible, flexile

Examples:
First of all I’d have to tie Josephine Francis down with an ironclad contract.

Origins:
1852, of warships, American English, from iron (n) + clad. Of contracts etc. 1884. As a noun meaning “ironclad ship, ” It is attested from 1864.

Folksy (adjective)

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Definitions:
if you describe something as folksy, you mean that it is simple and has a style characteristic of folk craft and tradition. If you describe somone as folksy, you mean that they are friendly and informal in their behaviour.

Synonyms:
pride, ambition, arrogance, over-confidence

Antonyms:
humility

Examples:
Chris’s tireless energy and folksy oratory were much in demand at constituency lunches., The shop’s folksy, small-town image attracted lots of tourists., The book has a certain folksy charm., His folksy personality sets the tone for the show.

Tips:
Hubris is a Greek word for “arrogance or pride,” which, in Greek mythology and literature, often leads to a character’s demise. The same application is often used today to describe executives or anyone in power. Hubris is a negative: not just pride, but excessive pride and over-confidence.

Prowess (noun)

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Definitions:
in the beginning of development or formation.

Synonyms:
ability, talent, courage

Antonyms:
incompetence, inadequacy

Examples:
– Her musical prowess was admired by all her classmates and teachers. – The rookie had the prowess of a veteran. – With two purple hearts, his military prowess could not be questioned

Tips:
Prowess originates from Old French proece, which means “valiant, brave.” Prowess is exceptional courage, strength, or skill. Commenting on someone’s prowess is a great compliment. The adjective adept, which means “skilled,” is a good way to compliment someone’s prowess. Use adept to describe someone’s skills and use prowess to denote the actual skill. (i.e: He is technologically adept (skilled) with computers. His technical prowess (skills, mastery) never ceases to amaze.)

Egregious (adjective)

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Definitions:
An egregious error, failure, problem, etc, is extremely bad and noticeable, conspicuously bad.

Synonyms:
blatant, glaring, rank, flagrant, outrageous, gross

Antonyms:
good, nice, remarkable

Examples:
– That was an egregious oversight on Phil’s part and could cost his company millions. – I don’t think it was that egregious; I know several people who have made that same mistake. – It was an egregious error for a diplomat to behave so arrogantly.

Subpoenaed (verb)

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Definitions:
to be ordered to come to a court of law and give evidence as a witness. Subpoena (noun): a writ ordering a person to attend a court.

Examples:
The Queen is above the law and cannot be subpoenaed., The judge issued a subpoena. – A subpoena may be issued to compel their attendance – Subpoenas were issued to several government employees. ORIGIN late Middle English (as a noun): from Latin sub poena under penalty