Barefaced (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) 1. undisguised: shamelessly undisguised 2. with bare face: with an uncovered or clean-shaven face

Synonyms:
flagrant, glaring, obvious, blatant

Examples:
That’s a barefaced lie!, My boss is a barefaced hypocrite

Aboveboard (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adverb/adjective) in an honest manner, open to scrutiny: honest, legal, and without deception

Synonyms:
legitimate, legal, honest, frank, lawful, overt

Antonyms:
dishonest, shady.

Examples:
Their business was open and aboveboard, Was known for dealing aboveboard in everything, The discussions were completely open and aboveboard.

Apoplectic (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) 1. furious: overcome with anger, overcome with anger; extremely indignant 2. exhibiting symptoms of stroke: having the symptoms of a stroke ( archaic )

Synonyms:
Furious

Examples:
In a fit of apoplexy, he thumped the table with both hands., He was apoplectic with rage/fury., The coach was so apoplectic when the player missed the free throw that he threw his clipboard onto the court

Flippant (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) 1. showing a lack of seriousness to the point that it is inappropriate and unseemly; 2. showing too much levity during a grave situation

Antonyms:
serious

Examples:
His flippant remarks during serious client meetings are a liability, so I would rather not have him there., Your jokes are usually funny, but today you’re just being flippant and disrespectful., I hope he didn’t think I was being flippant; I was just trying to lighten the mood., I don’t appreciate your flippant attitude; I’m trying to have a serious conversation with you.

Tips:
To be flippant is to have a rude or silly attitude or behavior when seriousness is expected. For example, if you were having a meeting to discuss ways to save your failing company and someone kept making sarcastic recommendations to be silly or humorous, that would be flippant. Flippant can also be used to describe an offhand remark that is simply rude or disrespectful. You may hear flip used in place of flippant, which is equally correct but is a more informal term.

Foist (verb)

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Definitions:
(verb) 1. to give somebody something inferior and pass it off as genuine, valuable, or worthy; 2. to impose something on someone surruptitiously; 3. to deceitfully insert and add something undesirable

Synonyms:
palm off, thrust, intrude, impose, encroach, inflict

Examples:
I enjoy a local, popular radio station for the music, but get highly frustrated when they constantly foist a particular political agenda., Infomercials are almost humorous in the way they foist average products as the most fantastic in latest innovation., Parents are becoming outraged at how junk food is foisted on children during Saturday morning cartoons., In certain tourist destinations, you may be inundated with people trying to foist fake Rolex watches and other products on you.

Tips:
Unwanted political agendas are foisted upon people everyday, in subtle ways. Newspapers, television news, and even radio disc jockeys foist biased views by twisting wording, making assumptions of common consensus, etc. Workloads can be foisted upon unassuming employees, and merchandise can be made to appear appealing and quality, (especially in a catalogue or online) so as to foist the un-savvy buyer. Watch out for contracts where a clause has been foisted, and you end up with the short end of the deal.

Flack (noun)

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Definitions:
A person chosen by a group or an organization that is in a difficult situation to speak officially for them to the public and answer questions and criticisms.

Synonyms:
grief, hardship, injustice, objection, outrage

Antonyms:
delight, happiness, joy, advantage

Examples:
They spent millions on lobbyists and flacks to improve their images.

Origins:
” publicity and press agent” 1945, also as a verb by that year, said to have been coined in showbiz magazine ” Variety” (but this is not the first attested use) , supposedly from name Gene Flack who was an advertising executive in the U.S during the 1940’s, but he seems to have sold principally biscuits, not movies.

Libel (verb)

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Definitions:
(verb) (n.) (v.) 1. to damage somebody’s reputation by publishing false and malicious statements; 2. to attack somebody with the intent of damaging their reputation

Synonyms:
slur, defamation, defame

Examples:
After posting a nasty, online message about his employer, the man was surprised when he was sued for libel., His libelous article cost the man his job and the newspaper, millions., The journalist’s shoddy investigative skills lead the news station to be sued for libel when certain documents referred to in the story turned out to be forged., Celebrities often sue tabloid publications for libel when lies are printed about them.

Tips:
The original meaning for libel was “written declaration,” and it later came to mean, “something setting out the grounds for a lawsuit.” It used to be that libel only applied to written works (like books), and the lesser charge of slander was the legal term for false and defamatory speech. With the popularity of television and radio, libel has been expanded to include any publicized work. Something described as libelous is defamatory or meant to damage a person’s reputation. To be accurate, use libel to describe written defamation and slander to describe oral, verbal, spoken defamation.

Munificent (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) extremely generous

Synonyms:
magnanimous, philanthropic, charitable, benevolent

Antonyms:
miserly

Examples:
Kind and munificent, they donate much of their time and money to charity., Mother Theresa said she was inspired by the munificence of Jesus., Such a munificent gift had never before been given to the University., It is a munificent gift, but a far too generous one for me to accept.

Tips:
Munificent is a formal word, meaning “very generous.” It has its origins in the Latin word munus, “gift or service.” Munificent rhymes with magnificent, so think of a magnificent gift. Someone who gives you this gift is munificent. Its noun form is munificence, which means “great generosity or magnanimity.”

Specious (verb)

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Definitions:
(verb) describes something that sounds true, but is actually false

Synonyms:
misleading, plausible, untrue, presumable, incorrect, wrong

Antonyms:
true, correct

Examples:
Her argument was specious and misleading., He believed her made up story because it was specious., The politician made several specious promises and claims in order to try to wind the election., I could see right through his specious argument, and I knew that he was trying to mislead me

Tips:
Specious is derived from the Latin speciosus, which means “appearance.” Specious describes things that appear to be true, but are really false.

Noisome (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) repulsive, extremely disgusting to the senses, or dangerous

Synonyms:
putrid, pernicious, dangerous, harmful, rank

Antonyms:
fragrant

Examples:
The noisome smells from the chemical plant kept the area clear of residents for miles., The locusts proved a noisome plague for farmers., She was sick and dizzy from being in contact with the noisome fumes., After the forest fire, the air quality in the area was so noisome that residents wore protective masks over their nose and mouth for several days.

Tips:
Noisome is related to the word annoy, but its meaning is much stronger. Noisome can refer to something extremely offensive, to the point of causing nausea. Noisome can also refer to something highly dangerous. Noisome is most often used in reference to foul or toxic smells. Do not confuse noisome with noisy, as there is really no relation between noisome (repulsive, disgusting to the senses, dangerous) and noise (sound, loud disruptive sound). Noisome is similar in meaning to noxious.