Iffy (adjective)

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Definitions:
1. uncertain: uncertain or unlikely to happen 2. undecided: undecided or unsure about something 3. dubious: dubious, suspicious, or unreliable

Synonyms:
dubious, questionable, undecided

Examples:
My car is iffy at the moment: will you drive?, The milk smells a bit iffy., I was hoping to go to the park but the weather’s looking a bit iffy.

Euphoria (noun)

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Definitions:
a feeling of extreme happiness or elation

Synonyms:
joy

Examples:
With their first World Cup win, the entire nation was in a sustained state of euphoria for days., When they discovered that they had won the lottery, they were euphoric., She felt so euphoric when she won the big account that she started dancing around her office., My afternoon massage rid me of all my tension, and I was in a state of euphoria for several hours afterwards.

Tips:
Euphoria is often seen as being a somewhat exaggerated emotion. The related adjective euphoric describes someone who is in a state of euphoria, or extreme happiness.

Exude (verb)

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Definitions:
1. to make apparent through behavior or body language; 2. to slowly release

Synonyms:
emanate, ooze, secrete, radiate, flow

Examples:
She exuded confidence as she walked through the room with a beaming smile and her head held high., A strange odor exuded from the laboratory., The liquid that exudes from the aloe plant is said to have healing properties., She seems to exude love and happiness whenever she is with her husband.

Tips:
The word exude has its origins in the Latin exsudare, “to ooze out like sweat” which comes from sudare, “to sweat.” When someone has a great deal of confidence, we often say that they ooze confidence, in other words, they exude confidence. Exude is a more positive-sounding word than ooze. For example, one would ooze insincerity or creepiness, while someone would exude confidence or love. Use exude when someone is so full of an emotion it seems to just pour out of them.

Anathema (noun)

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Definitions:
1. object of loathing; 2. someone who is cursed or shunned; 3. in religion, a curse accompanied by excommunication

Synonyms:
pariah, aversion, malediction

Antonyms:
praise, laudation

Examples:
Professor Smith’s ideas were anathema to most of his colleagues., Jim was excused from active duty the day before the battle, since the idea of taking another’s life was anathema to him., The ideas of the rebels were anathema to the loyalists., He was an anathema who frightened people everywhere he went.

Tips:
Anathema is derived from the Greek anathema, meaning “someone or something devoted to evil.” If you are an anathema, you are a person who is loathed for your evil ways. Anathema is synonymous with pariah. A pariah also refers to someone who is loathed, rejected, or disliked, but is less harsh than anathema, which is used to describe a person who is loathed and abhorred because of their evil ways. Anathema is also synonymous with abomination, which also denotes something that causes an aversion and is strongly disliked and hated. This context refers more to objects, ideas, and principals that create a strong and heavy aversion, dislike, or disgust.

Obscure (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) 1. unclear, unknown, or difficult to distinguish; 2. dark or hidden; (v.) to make less visible or unclear

Synonyms:
unknown, dim, obfuscated, conceal, cloudy, indistinct, ambiguous

Antonyms:
elucidate, distinct

Examples:
This beautiful sculpture was created by an obscure artist from a small town, but I’m sure he’ll be famous some day., Lawyers are expected to interpret obscure sections of legal code., Don’t let your emotions obscure your best judgment., The directions he gave us are so obscure, I’m not sure we’ll be able to find the place.

Tips:
Obscure comes from the Latin root scurus, “covered.” Something obscure is often hidden or hard to detect. Generally, anything that is unclear, hard to find or figure out, or not widely known can be described as obscure. The verb obscure means “to darken something or make it less distinct or understandable.”

Impediment (noun)

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Definitions:
(noun) an impairment of function or an obstacle or block to progress–a hindrance

Synonyms:
obstacle, hindrance

Examples:
James Earl Jones overcame a childhood speech impediment to become one of Hollywood’s most famous voices., The need to obtain a permit from the city is proving to be a major impediment to the completion of our home’s renovation., Although he is shy, he has not allowed his shyness to impede his ability to be a great salesman., In a number of African countries, civil war has been a major impediment to progress.

Tips:
The word impediment is sometimes heard in the term “speech impediment,” which refers to a lisp, stutter, or other difficulty or impairment in speaking. Impediment can also refer to any obstacle that slows down progress. See hindrance for a discussion on the difference between hindrance, impediment, and encumbrance. The related verb impede means “to slow down or cause problems.”

Erudite (adjective)

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Definitions:
having or containing tremendous knowledge from specialized study–learned or scholarly

Examples:
The erudite Shakespearean actor brought with him an uncanny authenticity to the stage., The erudite professor is known as the foremost authority on ancient languages., My aunt, who has continued her education throughout her life, is the most erudite person I know., I remember back in school, I often felt erudite when taking history and philosophy classes.

Tips:
Erudite is derived from the Latin rudtus, “to instruct.” Erudite is the opposite of untaught and unrefined. Erudite is a more sophisticated word for commenting on a person’s intelligence.

Inertia (noun)

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Definitions:
1. apathy: inability or unwillingness to move or act. 2. presistance to change: the property of a body by which it remains at rest or continues moving in a straight line unless acted upon by a directional force

Examples:
Many teachers were reluctant to use computers in their classrooms simply out of inertia., The organization is stifled by bureaucratic inertia., Inertia that grips so many of the club’s members is the reason why nothing ever gets done, By the nature of its own inertia, the coal industry has remained an unshakable constant

Succinct (adjective)

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Definitions:
Said in a clear and short way; expressing what needs to be said without unnecessary words.

Synonyms:
blunt, concise, curt, pithy

Antonyms:
lengthy, polite, long-winded,wordy

Examples:
This is the most succinctaccount that we can give of him and his affairs. “Better let this Miss Dean alone, ” was Laura’s succinct advise

Tips:
late Middle English (in the sense ‘encircled); from Latin succinctus ‘tucked up’ past participle of succingere, from sub- ‘from below’ +cingere ‘gird’

Bowdlerize (verb)

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Definitions:
to remove words or parts from a book, play or film that are considered to be unsuitable or offensive:

Synonyms:
edit, sanitize, cut, censor

Examples:
The version of the play that I saw had been dreadfully bowdlerized., The English translation was bowdlerized beyond recognition, That movie was a bowdlerized version of the book. ORIGIN: from the name of Dr Thomas Bowdler (1754-1825), an American who published an expurgated edition of Shakespeare.