Brassy (adjective)

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Definitions:
(of a person, typically a woman) tastelessly showy or loud in appearance or manner ALSO sounding like a brass musical instrument; harsh and loud.

Synonyms:
bold, forward, self-assertive

Examples:
A brassy customer insisted on arriving late and still being taken first., She was a fearless journalist, bold and brassy and never afraid to ask the toughest questions., The show’s musical numbers are big, brassy (= loud and showy), and spectacular.

Tips:
Brassy implies having complete confidence in yourself, sometimes in a way that shows a lack of respect

Encroach (verb)

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Definitions:
to intrude on (a person’s territory or a thing considered to be a right), advance gradually and in a way that causes damage.

Synonyms:
trespass on, inch, impose oneself on

Examples:
Each year the sea continues to encroach upon the island’s beaches, What the government is proposing encroaches on the rights of individuals., I resent it that my job is starting to encroach on my family life., They have promised that the development will not encroach on public land., The new censorship laws are serious encroachments on freedom of expression., Farmers encroached on forest land to grow crops., These devices are encroaching on people’s privacy.

Jaunty (adjective)

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Definitions:
having or expressing a lively, cheerful, and self-confident manner

Synonyms:
;, cheerful, jolly, lively, bubbly, breezy, merry, perky, bouncy, cheery, buoyant, joyful

Antonyms:
serious.

Examples:
Kevin looked pretty jaunty for the awards show, Oozing charm, the jaunty dance instructor literally swept the women off their feet, When he came back his hat was at a jaunty angle and he was smiling., He scampered jauntily down the stairs.

Jumble (Noun)

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Definitions:
(noun) an untidy collection or pile of things (verb) mix up in a confused or untidy way.

Synonyms:
muddle, confusion, clutter, disarray, imbroglio

Examples:
The house is always in a jumble before and after vacation trips, A jumble of rubber bands, batteries, and pencil stubs all stuffed into that drawer, The events of the last few weeks are all jumbled up in my mind., His clothes were all jumbled up in the suitcase, He rummaged through the jumble of papers on his desk.

Tips:
The typical teenager’s bedroom is usually a jumble of books, papers, clothing, CDs, and soda cans–the word suggests physical disorder and a mixture of dissimilar things. If the disorder exists on a figurative level, it is usually called a hodgepodge ( a hodgepodge of ideas, opinions, and quotations, with a few facts thrown in for good measure).

Pedantic (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) excessively concerned with minor details and rules or with displaying academic learning.

Synonyms:
particular, ostentatious

Antonyms:
practical, informal, simple

Examples:
The boy never used proper English, which bothered his pedantic teacher., The teacher was lax about math principles, but pedantic about grammatical ones., The professor’s lectures were so pedantic that most students came away from them more confused than enlightened.

Tips:
Pedantic is derived from the same Latin word, for “a teacher (pedagogue) who is overly concerned with the minor details of learning.” However, pedantic has come to characterize anyone who is overly concerned with minor details and tries to seem scholarly or intelligent by going on and on about trivial details that don’t really add much to the discussion or teaching.

Mawkish (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) sentimental in a feeble or sickly way

Synonyms:
sentimental, maudlin, sickly, sugary, cloying, oversweet, saccharine, oversentimental

Examples:
He keeps sending her these mawkish greeting cards, On TV there was a mawkish plea for donations to the charity, The film lapses into mawkish sentimentality near the end.

Tips:
If you are moved to tears by a situation that does not really warrant such a response, you’re likely to be called sentimental, an adjective used to describe a willingness to get emotional at the slightest prompting (a sentimental man who kept his dog’s ashes in an urn on the mantel). Effusive applies to excessive or insincere displays of emotion, although it may be used in an approving sense (effusive in her gratitude for the help she had received). Maudlin derives from the name Mary Magdalene, who was often shown with her eyes swollen from weeping. It implies a lack of self-restraint, particularly in the form of excessive tearfulness. Mawkish carries sentimentality a step further, implying emotion so excessive that it provokes loathing or disgust ( mawkish attempts to win the audience over).

Boon (noun)

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Definitions:
a thing that is helpful or beneficial, (of a companion or friend) close; intimate; favorite

Synonyms:
blessing, favor, good luck, profit, gift, windfall, good fortune, benefit

Antonyms:
blight, disadvantage

Examples:
The increased market activity proved to be a boon for investors., After a long, dry summer, the rainfall was a boon for farmers., The extreme summer heat proved to be a boon for the air-conditioning company, which sold more units than in any previous summer., Tiger Woods helped create a financial boon for the Golf Industry.

Tips:
Boon is often used to discuss sudden and great financial success. It can occasionally be used as an adjective as well. As an adjective, boon means “extremely close,” as in “boon companions.”

Epitomize (verb)

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Definitions:
1. To serve as the typical or ideal example of 2. To make of give an epitome of

Synonyms:
characterize, illustrate, embody, personify

Antonyms:
elongate, extend, prolong, amplify

Examples:
” You epitomize it beautifully” said Mr Caryll, with a reversion to his habitual manner. They epitomize the moral and intellectual life of the artist.

Origins:
1590’s “shorten, condense” from epitome + ize. Meaning “typify, embody” is from 1620’s. Related : Epitomized, epitomizing, epitomizes

Factitious (adjective)

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Definitions:
artificially created or developed.

Synonyms:
specious, counterfeit, spurious, mock, feigned

Examples:
Brokers created a factitious demand for stocks, Presumably the statue is of factitious marble, because for that price you’re not going to get the real stuff, The factitious friendliness shown by the beauty-pageant contestants to one another, He has invented a wholly factitious story about his past.

Tips:
Factitious, Unnatural. Anything is unnatural when it departs in any way from its simple or normal state; it is factitious when it is wrought out or wrought up by labor and effort, as, a factitious excitement. An unnatural demand for any article of merchandise is one which exceeds the ordinary rate of consumption; a factitious demand is one created by active exertions for the purpose. An unnatural alarm is one greater than the occasion requires; a factitious alarm is one wrought up with care and effort.

Reconcile (verb)

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Definitions:
(Verb) restore friendly relations between. To cause to coexist in harmony; make or show to be compatible or To make someone accept (a disagreeable or unwelcome thing) To make (one account) consistent with another, esp. by allowing for transactions begun but not yet completed.

Synonyms:
pacify, persuade, win over, conform, resolve, yield, resign, convince

Antonyms:
estrange, sever, separate

Examples:
The union leaders reconciled with the company when both succumbed to compromise., When Jane and Stewart realized that their long-standing feud was affecting the whole family, they decided to reconcile their differences., We will need to reconcile all the cancelled checks against invoices to verify that we paid all our expenses., She reconciled herself to the fact that she would never become a famous actress.

Tips:
Reconcile is derived from the Latin reconciliare, which literally means, “to make friendly again.” The related noun reconciliation refers to restoring a relationship or accepting an unpleasant situation or fate. Reconcile is often used in accounting and finance to describe adjusting or correcting numbers. To reconcile (yourself) to a situation is to accept it even if it is unpleasant or painful. To reconcile is to also balance two opposing beliefs or philosophies: “How do you reconcile your affinity for leather clothes with your opposition to eating beef and killing cows?”