Outwit (verb)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
(verb) deceive or defeat by greater ingenuity.

Synonyms:
fox, outsmart, overreach, outmaneuver, outfox

Examples:
The murderers always thought they could outwit Columbo, but of course they couldn’t, In the story, the cunning fox outwits the hunters., It is impossible to negotiate if one side feels that the other side is trying to outwit them., John had a plan to outwit his opponents at their own game

Ration (Noun)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
(noun) a fixed amount of a commodity officially allowed to each person during a time of shortage, as in wartime, allow each person to have only a fixed amount of (a particular commodity)

Synonyms:
;, control, restrict, quota, share, conserve., quantum, limit, portion

Examples:
The region has to ration water during times of drought, Rations of rice were distributed to the refugees., He fed prisoners the same rations he fed his own troops., Supplies of food were low and we had to ration out the little that was left., During the war, no one was allowed more than their ration of food, clothing and fuel., Do you remember when petrol was rationed to five gallons a week?, My children would watch television all day long, but I ration it.

Substantiate (verb)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
(verb) provide evidence to support or prove the truth of.

Antonyms:
debunk

Examples:
The news organization had to apologize for airing a story it could not substantiate., The lawyer asked the witness to substantiate the defendant’s testimony., We need to substantiate these great ideas by executing them., Joey and I make it a priority to get together for coffee on a weekly basis, because it substantiates our friendship.

Tips:
Think of the related noun substance, as it means “important or factual material.” Substantiate means “to prove substance in order to back up a claim” or “to give substance to the claim.” Something that has substance is concrete and proven, therefore, substantiate also means “to strengthen or to make something concrete.” One can, for example, substantiate (strengthen) a relationship or substantiate (embody, make concrete) one’s feelings by acting them out.

Vacuous (verb)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
(verb) having or showing a lack of thought or intelligence; mindless

Synonyms:
silly, unintelligent, foolish, inane, stupid, insipid

Antonyms:
intelligent.

Examples:
That vacuous laugh of his drives me nuts, Mark hates his boss’s a vacuous remarks/expression/smile, The religious leader denounced America’s vacuous, consumer-oriented culture and called for a return to religious values., A movie that was derided for its vacuous dialogue

Forte (noun)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
a thing at which someone excels

Synonyms:
talent, specialty, ability, skill, strength, aptitude

Antonyms:
incompetence, inability, inefficiency, weakness

Examples:
Connecting well with clients has always been his forte; that’s what makes him such a great account executive., I’m on the creative end of the advertising industry because marketing strategy and client negotiations are not my forte, but creative design is., I’m afraid singing isn’t one of my fortes., Negotiating is not my forte; that’s why I hire attorneys to manage my negotiations.

Tips:
Forte is derived from the French fort, meaning “strong.” A person’s forte is his or her strength–something at which the person excels. In music vernacular, forte (the “e” pronounced with an “ay” sound) refers to a note or passage which is to be played loudly, or is an adjective, meaning “loudly.” When using forte to mean strength, talent, or ability, it is correct to either pronounce the “e” or not.

Venerate (verb)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
(verb) regard with great respect; revere.

Synonyms:
;, hallow, exalt, regard highly, Tip, worship

Examples:
Gandhi became an object of widespread veneration because of his unceasing struggle for freedom and equality., Robert Burns is Scotland’s most venerated poet., The venerable American jeweler, Tiffany & Company, appointed a new president., The American writer Mark Twain has been venerated for almost a century., A church is a proper setting in which to venerate God

Measly (adjective)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
(adjective) contemptibly small or few.

Synonyms:
scanty, inconsequential, inadequate

Examples:
He offered them only one measly cookie, We got a measly 2% raise last year., a measly amount of money / a measly little present

Offbeat (adjective)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
Unusual and strange and therefore surprising and noticeable.

Synonyms:
bizarre, eccentric,unconventional

Antonyms:
common, normal, regular, standard

Examples:
The hour – I am sorry I cannot recall the hour of arrival- but it was, as we say, an offbeat hour.

Scowl (noun)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
(noun) an angry or bad-tempered expression. (verb) frown in an angry or bad-tempered way.

Synonyms:
glower at, give someone a dirty look., frown at, grimace at

Antonyms:
grin

Examples:
The boy scowled at her and reluctantly followed her back into school., When I asked the boss for a day off, he just scowled and told me to get back to work., She is clearly annoyed, as you can tell from the scowl on her face., The man across the street never seems to wear anything but a scowl

Extenuate (verb)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
( extenuating) make (guilt or an offense) seem less serious or more forgivable

Synonyms:
mollify, ameliorate, condone

Examples:
When stopped by the police, the commuter tried to extenuate her driving in the bike lane by claiming that many other drivers were also doing the same thing., The judge felt that the recent, bizarre circumstances in the woman’s life did in fact extenuate her irrational behavior., You can’t judge her behavior without considering the extenuating circumstances that led to her problems., The extenuating circumstances for my tardiness are that I got stuck in traffic and couldn’t find a parking space.

Tips:
The related adjective extenuating describes something, usually circumstances, that partially excuse and justify an act. To extenuate is to lesson the force of an accusation. Think, “gloss over” or extend innocence through excuses. Extenuate is related to mitigate. Both words have similar Latin origins that mean “to soften or reduce.” Both words are used to soften a situation and make it less severe. Extenuate and extenuating almost always refer to lessening an accusation or the judgment and punishment of a bad act, while mitigate and mitigating are not specific to accusation or judgment.