Low ball (verb and adjective )

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Definitions:
(verb) Informal North American English. To deliberately and unrealistically offer a low estimate for a service or merchandise. (adjective) to engage in lowballing

Synonyms:
estimate, approximate, guess

Antonyms:
distant, exact, over estimate, over value

Examples:
(verb)John will probably give a low ball offer, in order to pay less. This may seem as a low ball number, however it has merit to illustrate the changes required. (adjective) I shall restrain from engaging in lowballing activities.

Tips:
Low ball or low balling is informal English/slang. It depicts the act of offering someone an unfairly “low” estimate of something. To trick or decieve.

Origins:
Originating from North American slang. Used as the literal description which depicts an offer, lower than the estimate, in an unfair circumstance.

Covet (verb)

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Definitions:
(verb) yearn to possess something (especially, that which does not belong to you). Negative: to desire wrongfully, without due to regard to the rights of others.

Synonyms:
desire, want, crave, fancy,

Antonyms:
controlled, moderate, temperate,

Examples:
I shall covet as I see fit. I covet to be a part of their establishments. I covet to own one of their cars.

Tips:
To be used in the negative. To covet anothers property. To have a wrongful and inordinate desire.

Origins:
Originating from Latin ‘cupiditas’ and Old French “cuveitier”, then translated into English of “cupidity”. Commonly used in middle English as “covet”.

Vice (noun)

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Definitions:
(noun) immoral or wicked behavior., criminal activities involving prostitution, pornography, or drugs. ? an immoral or wicked personal characteristic., a weakness of character or behavior; a bad habit

Synonyms:
shortcoming, flaw, wrongdoing, fault, badness

Examples:
That section of the city is legendary for crime and vice, Curiosity in children is not a vice, but something to be encouraged, Greed, pride, envy, dishonesty and lust are considered to be vices., My one real vice (= bad habit) is chocolate., His only vice is smoking a cigar once in a while., The chief of police said that he was committed to wiping out vice in the city.

Malady (noun)

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Definitions:
(noun) a disease or ailment.

Synonyms:
disease, ailment, infection

Examples:
Every time we visit Jerry, he has a new malady, All the rose bushes seem to be suffering from the same mysterious malady., Apathy is one of the maladies of modern society., Smoking has been linked to lung cancer and other maladies., in the olden days people were always suffering from some unknown malady

Incumbent (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) Obligatory, necessary as a result of a duty, responsibility, or obligation. (noun) the person holding the position or office

Synonyms:
inaugurated, requisite, compelling, obligatory, acting

Antonyms:
discretionary, nonobligatory

Examples:
It is incumbent on parents to teach their children the difference between right and wrong., It is incumbent upon the corporation to take action against new market competitors., The incumbent will need to fight a strong battle against her opponent in order to stay in office., It was incumbent on the ambassador to learn the culture of the county in which she would be practicing diplomacy.

Tips:
Incumbent is used in two ways: to discuss the holding of an office or position (as in politics) or to denote obligation. Use incumbent as an easier and more sophisticated way of saying “obligatory.” You will often hear incumbent used in the phrase “it is incumbent upon someone to do something.”

Duress (noun)

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Definitions:
Forcible restrain or restriction; threats or violence used to coerce a person into doing something; illegal force to make somebody do something

Synonyms:
threat

Antonyms:
beseeching

Examples:
If it wasn’t for the great duress put upon him by his neighbors, he would never have moved the junk he let pile up on his front yard., The Board was under duress to hire a new CEO., He claimed that the confession was invalid because it was signed under duress., The criminal finally confessed to the crime under duress from the interrogating officer.

Tips:
Duress is derived from the Latin duritia, meaning “hardness,” and from durus, “hard.” Think, hard pressure. In law, duress may be used against a criminal suspect or a prisoner in lawful custody to get information or a confession. In law, a contract is null and void if it is signed under duress (force, undue pressure).

Trivialize (verb)

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Definitions:
(verb) To make something seem less important than it really is. Trivial means: having little value or importance.

Synonyms:
make light of

Examples:
Don’t trivialize the seriousness of the issue!, I would appreciate it if you would not trivialize my problems, Sexual harassment in the workplace is not a trivial matter., I’m fascinated by the trivia of everyday life., I’m a busy man – don’t bother me with trivialities.

Pursuit (Noun)

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Definitions:
(noun) Act of striving for something; the effort made to try to achieve or obtain something over a period of time. A hobby, pastime; act of chasing after something, the act of chasing after somebody or something.

Synonyms:
striving toward, search for, diversion, pastime, activity, quest after/for

Examples:
The constant pursuit of the rock band by a horde of screaming fans as they roamed about the city, The gang fled from the scene of the crime with the police in hot pursuit., Jean immediately jumped into her car and set off in hot pursuit of the truck., The hunters spent hours pursuing their prey., He’s been pursuing her for months and yet she’s so clearly not interested., I enjoy outdoor pursuits, like hiking and riding.

Thwart (verb)

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Definitions:
(verb) Prevent from succeeding in or accomplishing something; to frustrate something, to oppose and defeat the efforts, plans or ambitions.

Synonyms:
foil, outwit

Examples:
The man tried to thwart the city’s plans to build a shopping mall right next to his house., The government has put many plans in place, designed to thwart another terrorist attack., The quick-thinking security guard noticed the masked man and thwarted his plan to rob the bank., My plans to leave the office early were thwarted by my boss, who asked me to stay late.

Tips:
Thwart is most often used when something planned or expected is physically prevented from happening. Thwart is a great word to use to describe someone disrupting the plans of another, by doing something that impedes the goals or objectives of the other. Usually the hero thwarts the evil plans of the villain, but thwart doesn’t always have to be used in that context

Reprieve (verb)

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Definitions:
(verb and noun) cancel or postpone the punishment of (someone, esp. someone condemned to death) : save, rescue; informal take off the hit list.

Synonyms:
suspend

Antonyms:
proceed, prolong, extension

Examples:
The medication gave the cancer patient a reprieve from her pain., This injection should help provide a reprieve of your pain., “Please reprieve my punishment,” the convict begged of the judge., My two-week-long vacation was a wonderful reprieve from the stress of my job.

Tips:
Reprieve comes from Middle French repris, past participle of reprendre, “to take back,” as in, “take back and provide relief from pain or punishment.” A common use of the word reprieve is when someone receives a reprieve (pardon) from a prison sentence.