Profligate (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) Wasteful, extremely extravagant or given to spending money freely or foolishly.

Synonyms:
wanton, reckless, prodigal, spendthrift, corrupt, shameless, spender, wild

Antonyms:
restrained, frugal, virtuous

Examples:
The man loved his wife but hated her profligate spending habits., His business partner was a profligate waster who spent all the company’s profits., The virtuous man turned into a profligate after he won the lottery., His profligate activities eventually landed him in jail.

Tips:
Profligate is derived from the Latin profligare, which means “defeat, ruin.” Profligate’s modern meaning has derived from the notion that a person is defeated by excessive vices. For a memory trick, think how “gate” is now added to words to denote scandal (originating from the Nixon Watergate scandal). Profligate describes scandalous behavior or refers to a reckless, wasteful person.

Succumb (verb)

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Definitions:
(verb) To die or suffer badly from an illness, to lose the determination to oppose something; to accept defeat.

Synonyms:
surrender, cave in, give in, perish, submit, buckle, pass away, quit, die

Antonyms:
fight, defend, resist

Examples:
He was determined not to succumb to temptation while on the diet., After years of suffering, the man finally succumbed to his illness., The government was unlikely to succumb to the demands of the kidnappers., I succumbed to his request, though I was not happy to do so.

Tips:
Think of the related word submit, as it means “to yield control.” Succumb means you have submitted to defeat. You have probably heard someone say, “I can’t believe you succumbed to their demands.” Notice the differences in the following words: If you capitulate to something, you surrender or completely cave in. If you succumb to something, you give up or give in because you don’t believe you can win. If you acquiesce, you agree passively, without putting up a fight.

Mishap (noun)

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Definitions:
(noun) Bad luck, or an unlucky event or accident.

Synonyms:
problem, setback, trouble, difficulty

Examples:
Even a minor mishap can have serious consequences, Although there were a few minor mishaps, none of the pancakes stuck to the ceiling, The parade was very well organised and passed without mishap., A series of mishaps led to the nuclear power plant blowing up.

Intricate (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) very complicated or detailed, having a lot of small parts or pieces arranged in a complicated way, and therefore difficult to understand in detail.

Synonyms:
complex, entangled

Antonyms:
simple

Examples:
The plan was so intricate, I was sure there was an easier way to complete the project., We can’t let him go because he is the only person who understands all the intricacies of the project., The quilt, with all of its intricate needlework, took her over a year to complete., The police uncovered an intricate network of criminal behavior involved in the money laundering scheme

Tips:
Intricate is derived from the Latin intricare, “to entangle or perplex,” which has its roots in tricae, “tricks.” Think of something intricate as being tricky, or hard to figure out. The noun intricacy refers to a complexity or difficulty and is often used to describe details in business.

Perk (countable noun)

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Definitions:
Perks are special benefits that are given to people who have a particular job or belong to a particular group.

Synonyms:
fringe, benefit, advantage, extra, bonus

Antonyms:
disadvantage, loss

Examples:
Decisions on their own depression and self-assertion perk this is a woman. House prices are expected to perk up.

Dispel (verb)

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Definitions:
(verb) to make (a doubt, feeling, or belief) disappear, drive (something) away; scatter, rid somebody’s mind of a thought or an idea, especially an erroneous one

Examples:
– The morning sun dispelled the fog, We need to dispel the myths and establish real facts., Ok, please allow me to dispel your fears

Tips:
If you scatter something, you throw it about in different directions, often using force (: the wind scattered leaves around the yard). Disperse implies a scattering that completely breaks up a mass or assemblage and spreads the units far and wide (: the crowd dispersed as soon as the storm arrived; the ships were so widely dispersed that they couldn’t see each other). To dispel is to scatter or to drive away something that obscures, confuses, or bothers (: to dispel her fears)

Palpable (adjective)

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Definitions:
1. (of a feeling or atmostphere) so intense as to seem almost tangible. 2. able to be touched or felt.

Synonyms:
tangible

Antonyms:
unclear

Examples:
The tension at the meeting was palpable and thick., Her excitement was palpable and everyone in the room felt it., The palpability of the success of my diet was evident in my smaller dress size., John’s nervousness was palpable and I tried to get him to calm down.

Tips:
Palpable is derived from the Late Latin palpabilis, which means “that which may be touched or felt.” Something palpable can be touched or felt, and is obvious. The noun palpability refers to the quality of being perceivable by touch.

Hyperbole (noun)

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Definitions:
A way of speaking or writing that makes someone or something sound, bigger, better, more, etc. than they are.

Synonyms:
exaggeration, overstatement

Antonyms:
understatement

Examples:
“These peanuts are so fantastic I could eat a million of them,” he said with a measure of hyperbole., Most of the analysts dismissed the CEO’s prediction of burgeoning market share as hyperbole., Of course there was some hyperbole in his statement, but the company really does expect record growth next year, and most of the numbers support his predictions., Since Dave’s stories were known to be full of hyperbole, his friends took everything he said with a grain of salt.

Tips:
A hyperbole denotes a clear and intended exaggeration. Note the word hype in hyperbole. Hype refers to greatly exaggerated publicity. Hyperbole is used more to denote statements that are gross exaggeration used to deceive people. Politicians often use hyperbole and accuse other politicians of using hyperbole (exaggerated statements).

Impervious (adjective)

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Definitions:
1. not affected by outside influence, remaining unaffected by other’s opinions, arguments, suggestions, etc.; 2. unable to be penetrated or not allowing passage into or through something; 3. unable to be injured or damaged

Synonyms:
invulnerable, impermeable, unmoved, unaffected

Antonyms:
responsive

Examples:
– The candidate seemed impervious to their attacks, maintaining popularity despite the negative campaign ads being run against her. – George seemed impervious to pain as he hiked down the mountain with a sprained ankle. – He seemed to be impervious to the criticism made against him and continued with his same modus operendi. – My thermal blanket forms an impervious shield from the cold and enables me to sleep warmly through the night.

Tips:
Impervious includes the root word pervious which stems from Latin per, “through” and via, “way.” When you add the negative im-, “not” to pervious, impervious becomes an adjective that describes anything that does NOT let something else get through, be it criticism, pain, or rain.

Upbraid (verb)

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Definitions:
(verb) Reprimand somebody; to criticize or scold somebody in a harsh manner; to forcefully or angrily tell someone they should not have done a particular thing and criticize them for having done it., To reproach, blame.

Synonyms:
admonish, rebuke, reprove

Examples:
In newspaper articles she consistently upbraided those in authority who overstepped their limits., We were upbraided for leaving the back door unlocked, They upbraided them for making such a careless mistake

Tips:
Upbraid also implies a lengthy expression of displeasure or criticism, but usually with more justification than scold and with an eye toward encouraging better behavior in the future (the tennis coach upbraided her players for missing so many serves).