Feint (noun and verb )

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Definitions:
1. (noun) a deceptive or pretended blow, thrust, or other movement, especially in boxing or fencing. ” a brief feint at the opponents face” 2. (verb) make a deceptive or distracting movement, especially during a fight. ” Adam feinted with his right then swung with his left”

Synonyms:
ruse, bluff, distraction, hoodwink, hoax, dodge

Antonyms:
frankness, honesty, truth

Examples:
She made a feint of accepting the herb, and then pointed to him and to the road. “Forgive me if I have stayed too long” she said making a feint of opening the door.

Tips:
Feint is confused with faint.

Mangy (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective ) in poor condition; shabby; having many worn or threadbare spot; showing signs of wear and tear

Synonyms:
scabby, scabrous, scruffy, scaly

Examples:
We need to get rid of that mangy old carpet in the bedroom., Mangy also means old and dirty: Throw away that mangy rug., My grandpa always drinks his whisky in his mangy old armchair, There was only a mangy old car that was covered in rust

Traduce (noun)

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Definitions:
1. to expose to shame or blame by means of falsehood and misinterpretation. 2. violate, betray – traduce a principle of law

Synonyms:
defame, slander, malign, vilify

Antonyms:
compliment, flatter, honor, praise, exalt

Examples:
You who call yourself my mother, how dare you traduce me so, you who bore me! And now he was trying to libel her, to traduce her to her father.

Tips:
Traduce is one of a number of English synonyms that you can choose when you need a word that means ” to injure by speaking ill of “. Choose “traduce” when you want to stress the deep humiliation, disgrace, and distress felt by the victim.

Valiant (adjective)

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Definitions:
Brave or determined, when conditions are difficult or dangerous; possessing or acting with bravery or boldness

Synonyms:
brave, valorous, heroic, intrepid, courageous, gallant

Antonyms:
Cowardly

Examples:
The President praised the valiant soldiers in Iraq, The company has made a valiant effort/attempt in the last two years to make itself more efficient., The team made a valiant effort to take the lead in the third quarter, but they were too far behind.

Raunchy (adjective (informal))

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Definitions:
1. energetically earthy and sexually explicit. “his rauchy new novel” 2. shabby or grubby “The restaurants style is raunchy and the sanitation chancy”

Synonyms:
x-rated, erotic, filthy, foul- mouthed, bawdy

Examples:
The stage act is a little too raunchy for television. When half-asleep and off-guard her vocabulary was raunchy.

Origins:
1939,” clumsy, careless, sloppy” U.S Army Air Corps slang, of unknown origin. Origins among cadets in Texas suggest possible connection to Mexican Spanish rancho (see ranch(n)), which had connotations of animal filth by 1864. Sense of “coarse, vulgar, smutty, ” is from 1967. Related: raunchiness

Red herring (noun)

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Definitions:
1. A dried smoked herring, which is turned red by the smoke. 2. A clue or piece of information which is or is intended to be misleading or distracting. ” The argument about women’s choices is largely a red herring”

Synonyms:
attention-grabber, smoke screen, plot, bait

Examples:
It was a foregone conclusion that a red herring should become their sign after that! His first sign of recovery was his craving for a red herring.

Tips:
A red herring might be intentionally used, such as in mystery fiction or as part as rhetorical strategies (e.g in politics), or it could be inadvertently used during argumentation.

Origins:
The term was popularized in 1807 by English polemicist William Cobbett, who told a story of having used a kipper (a strong smelling smoked fish) to divert hounds from chasing a hare.

Bungle (verb)

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Definitions:
To carry out (a task) clumsily or incompetently, leading to failure or an unsatisfactory outcome.

Synonyms:
ruin, spoil, blunder

Examples:
She bungled the job the first time she tried to do it., What bungling idiot wired up the plug like this!, He is a fool who bungles consistently., They bungled the robbery.

Scapegoat (noun)

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Definitions:
(noun) A person who is blamed for the wrongdoing, mistakes or faults of others, esp. for reason of expediency

Synonyms:
whipping boy

Examples:
The captain was made a scapegoat for the team’s failure., When things don’t go well, people always look for a scapegoat., Companies often use the economy as a scapegoat to avoid taking responsibility for dropping sales, It was not me, find yourself another scapegoat!

Perennial (adjective)

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Definitions:
(Adjective) Active throughout the year; living for many years; recurring or enduring; constantly recurring; lasting for an indefinite time. apparently permanently engaged in a specified role or way of life.

Synonyms:
enduring

Examples:
We seem to have a perennial problem when it comes to having enough money set aside for Christmas presents., His perennial happiness made everyone around him a bit more cheery and optimistic., I’m planning on planting some perennial plants in my garden so I can enjoy their flowers year after year., “The Grinch” is a perennial favorite among plays during the Christmas season.

Tips:
A plant that produces flowers year after year is referred to as a perennial. Thus, something described as perennial occurs again and again and is enduring. “You’d better not,” warns Steve, “Curiosity killed the cat, you know. It might be very dangerous. Let’s just go home instead.”

Portend (verb)

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Definitions:
( Verb) be a sign or warning that something is likely to happen. To indicate or signify; especially something unpleasant.

Synonyms:
foretell, prophesy, hint, signify, predict, forecast

Antonyms:
hide, conceal

Examples:
Exit polls are designed to portend results of an election before the votes are actually counted., The initial findings of the research study did not portend well for the scientist’s theory., The dark clouds may portend an impending thunderstorm., The tone in her boss’ voice when he asked Sherry to come up to his office was gruff and did not portend well for her.

Tips:
Portend is derived from the Latin portendere, which means “foretell.” Something that portends predicts the future. Often used with the word “well” (which, by the way, can help you remember, since it rhymes with foretell), as in, “This does not portend well for our future.” Portend is similar to bode, but portend usually is an omen of something bad, while bode is an indication of something either good or bad. Both words are usually followed by the word “well.” (i.e: “The new financial figures bode well for the future success of our company.”) Portend is often used as a more sophisticated way of saying “foretell” or “predict.”