Circumlocution (noun)

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Definitions:
The use of many words where fewer would do, esp. in a deliberate attempt to be vague or evasive, evasion in speech, especially to indirectly say something unpleasant Usage

Synonyms:
redundancy

Antonyms:
directness

Examples:
After a few glasses of wine, Jerry began to talk with circumlocution and never got to his point., The phrase “developmentally disabled” is a kind of circumlocution which tries to be politically correct., The senator’s circumlocutory way of speaking can make journalists quite impatient with him., Your circumlocution is getting us nowhere; please be direct and get to the point!

Tips:
Circumlocution is a way of trying to get around a subject by not getting directly to the point. Politicians use it frequently. One could say politicians are often inclined to use circumlocutory language. “Circumlocution office” is a negative term referring to red tape in a governmental office.

Heckle (verb)

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Definitions:
(verb) (often be heckled) interrupt (a public speaker) with derisive or aggressive comments or abuse.

Synonyms:
jeer, jibe at, boo, hiss, shout down

Examples:
A few angry locals started heckling (the speaker)., Cinderella was constantly heckled by her stepsisters, The heckler was ejected from the hall by a couple of police officers., He was heckled by the drunk in the back of the room

Newfangled (adjective)

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Definitions:
different from what one is used to; objectionably new and untested

Antonyms:
oldfangled

Examples:
I’m not sure I trust his newfangled approach to business management., Frank really doesn’t understand this newfangled technology that they’re trying to push on everyone, Mark will never learn how to play these newfangled video games., Lisa criticizes anything she doesn’t understand by stating that it’s newfangled and unnecessary.

Tips:
Something that is newfangled is new and original. Describing an idea as newfangled is often perceived as a critique because new and untested ideas can initially be looked at with suspicion and mistrust.

Bland (adjective)

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Definitions:
lacking strong features or characteristics and therefore uninteresting, (of food or drink) mild or insipid, (of a person or behavior) showing no strong emotion; dull and unremarkable

Synonyms:
insipid, tedious

Examples:
Bland food that was good for babies and invalids., I find chicken a little bland., Pop music these days is so bland., This sauce has a sharp taste and isn’t bland at all.

Garrulous (adjective)

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Definitions:
excessively talkative, esp. on trivial matters.

Synonyms:
loquacious, wordy, talkative, prolix

Antonyms:
taciturn, terse, quiet

Examples:
The politician’s latest speech was just another instance of garrulity without substance., Although the girl was otherwise a good student, her garrulous nature often got her into trouble for not paying attention in class., I don’t mind people who are loquacious and talk a lot; I just don’t like people who are garrulous and go on and on about trivial subjects., It’s not in my nature to be garrulous; I prefer to sit and listen to others.

Tips:
If a speech is said to be garrulous, this is usually a criticism. A person who is said to be garrulous is being critiqued for talking too much about something of little importance. The noun form is garrulity. Garrulous is synonymous with verbose and loquacious. Garrulous is the most critical as it means you are talking too much and with little substance. Verbose means you are using too many words to convey your point. Loquacious is tending to talk a great deal, which can be good or bad.

Jinx (noun)

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Definitions:
(noun) A person or thing that brings bad luck. (verb) bring bad luck to; cast an evil spell on

Synonyms:
malediction, evil eye

Examples:
After years of bad luck they finally broke the jinx, The family is jinxed, There’s a jinx on this computer – it’s gone wrong three times this morning!, I must be jinxed – whenever I wash a wine glass, it breaks., I didn’t want to say anything to him — I was afraid I might jinx him., There must be a jinx on our team — four of our best players were injured yesterday.

Flummox (verb)

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Definitions:
perplex (someone) greatly; bewilder

Synonyms:
;, baffle, puzzle, mystify, confound, bemuse

Examples:
I have to say that last question flummoxed me., He looked completely flummoxed., At age ten, he created intricate math problems that flummoxed his teachers

Amid (preposition)

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Definitions:
Also amidst (formal): surrounded by; in the middle of : in an atmosphere or against a background of

Synonyms:
surrounded by, amongst

Examples:
On the floor, amid mounds of books, were two small envelopes., The new perfume was launched amidst a fanfare of publicity., Pope John Paul arrived in New Delhi amid tight security to begin a 10-day tour of India., The truce collapsed amid fears of a revolt (at a time of, in an atmosphere of, against a background of.)

Pester (verb)

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Definitions:
(Verb) trouble or annoy (someone) with frequent or persistent requests or interruptions .

Synonyms:
badger, harass, annoy, trouble, hound, plague

Examples:
She pestered his brother by incessantly asking him for help with his homework, At the frontier, there were people pestering tourists for cigarettes, food or alcohol., John has been pestering her to go out with him all month., The kids keep pestering me to buy them a new video game.

Sardonic (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) disdainfully mocking, cynically mocking, lack of respect in a humorous but unkind way. grimly mocking or cynical

Synonyms:
sarcastic, arrogant, cynical, biting

Antonyms:
nice, respectful

Examples:
The comedian’s sardonic observations about the state of politics in our country elicited laughter because they had so much truth in them., His sardonic expression led me to believe that he was being mean and sarcastic in an attempt to make me look foolish in front of everyone., It’s hard to tell when she’s joking because she says everything with a sardonic smile., His jokes were meant to be funny, but their sardonic nature made just made him seem bitter.

Tips:
Sardonic is derived from the the Greek phrase sardonios gelos, which means “bitter or scornful laughter.” It may be helpful to think of the phonetically similar word “sarcastic.” Sardonic describes sarcastic humor, mainly intended to be scornful–mean and mocking.