Consummate (verb)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
1.make (a marriage or relationship) complete by having sexual intercourse. 2. complete (a transaction or attempt); make perfect. 3. showing a high degree of skill and flair; complete or perfect.

Synonyms:
ultimate, talented, fulfill, culminate, supreme, conclude, gifted

Antonyms:
inadequate, incomplete, deficient

Examples:
Annie was a consummate office assistant; professional, punctual, and always helpful., Let’s consummate the new business by taking the client out to lunch after the contracts have been signed., The soccer team’s win was consummated with a victory dinner., He was a consummate professional who never allowed personal feelings to get in the way of business.

Tips:
The verb consummate is spelled the same as the adjective consummate but is pronounced differently (short a on the adjective, long on the verb). Use the adjective consummate to describe someone who is perfect or ideal at something. (i.e: “He is the consummate salesman–he always knows the right thing to say to win the sale.”) Consummate can also be used to describe something negative. (i.e: “He is a consummate {perfect, skilled, complete} liar.”) The verb consummate means “to complete or fulfill.” In business, you can consummate a deal over dinner. In relationships, consummate means “to have sex and ‘complete’ the relationship.”

Concur (verb)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
1. to agree or approve; 2. to work or act together cooperatively; 3. to happen at the same time–to coincide

Synonyms:
cooperate

Antonyms:
disagree, diverge

Examples:
Yes, I would concur with that statement; I think you are absolutely right., The goal of improving education is an issue on which both parties concur., The plan to hire a new marketing manager and to redesign the company web site were concurrent decisions intended to improve the firm’s image and sales., We have presented what we believe is the best project plan, and we hope you concur.

Tips:
Concur is a more sophisticated way of stating agreement, as in: “Do you concur? Yes, I concur (agree).” It originates from the Latin concurrere, “to meet, coincide.” Concur can also mean “to happen together.” Think of the verb occur–to happen–and the prefix con-, which means “together,” and you have concur, which refers to multiple activities occurring together. The adjective form of concur, concurrent, means “happening at the same time or running parallel–simultaneous.”

Ensconce (verb)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
establish or settle (someone) in a comfortable, safe, or secret place

Synonyms:
situate, stash, bury, conceal

Antonyms:
depart, distroy, disarrange, disorder

Examples:
Dan was ensconced at the bar when I arrived., After dinner, I ensconced myself in a deep armchair with a book., The Prime Minister is now firmly ensconced in Downing Street with a large majority., The kids had contentedly ensconced themselves on the couch before the TV

Abominable (adjective)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
Very bad or unpleasant., Causing moral revulsion.

Synonyms:
obnoxious, odious

Examples:
The abominable working conditions made many workers sick., The prisoners are forced to live in abominable conditions., The weather’s been abominable all week.

Tips:
Persons and things that are truly loathsome or terrifying can be called abominable (: an abominable act of desecration; the abominable snowman), although this word is often used as an overstatement to mean “awful” (: abominable taste in clothes).

Accoutrements (noun)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
1 a) equipment, trappings: specifically: a soldiers outfit usually not including clothes and weapons- usually used in plural. B) an accessory item of clothing or equipment- usually used in plural. 2. an identifying and often superficial characteristic or device – usually used in plural 3. archaic: The act of accoutring

Synonyms:
appliance, device, contraption, gear

Examples:
The accoutrement lay by the chair its owner had been lounging in. The men-at-arms sank to their knees with a rattle and ring of accoutrement.

Tips:
mid 16 Century: From French, from accoutrer ‘clothe, equip’

Juxtapose (verb)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
place or deal with close together for contrasting effect.

Synonyms:
neighboring, touching, adjacent

Examples:
The exhibition juxtaposes Picasso’s early drawings with some of his later works., The exhibition juxtaposes architectural drawings with photographs of the buildings as constructed., The juxtaposition of the original painting with the fake clearly showed up the differences., In her documentary, the director juxtaposed poverty with affluence in order to evoke more emotion from the audience

Tips:
Juxtaposed is derived from the Latin juxta, “beside” and pose, “put into position.” Therefore, juxtaposed literally means, “in a side-by-side position.” The verb juxtapose means “to place side by side,” often for comparison. The related noun is juxtaposition and denotes a comparison or relationship between two or more things. For a memory trick, note how juxtapose sounds like “just suppose.” Now, imagine you wanted to paint a wall and you asked your roommate to “just suppose we painted the wall this color green or this color blue” and swatches of each color were juxtaposed (presented side by side) on the wall for your roommate to consider. Juxtaposed is similar in meaning to adjacent.

Ardor (noun)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
Enthusiasm or passion. Intensely deep feeling or emotion

Synonyms:
enthusiasm, passion., eagerness, fervor, devotion

Antonyms:
disinterest, apathy, coolness, indifference

Examples:
In his ardor for collecting, Kevin spent the contents of his savings account on comic books., His ardor for classic cars was dampened by the fact that he could not afford to collect them., The young sales recruits were filled with an ardor for their position, which pleased their supervisor., Jenny’s ardor for helping others led her to volunteer with a number of charitable organizations.

Tips:
Ardor is derived from the Latin ardere, “to burn.” Think, “burning with feeling.” Ardor is synonymous with fervor, which comes from a Latin origin “to boil.” Both words can be used to describe deep, burning, and intensely passionate emotions. Ardor is a more sophisticated way of saying “passion.”

Extricate (verb)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
free (someone or something) from a constraint or difficulty

Synonyms:
free, disentangle, release

Antonyms:
tangle, mire, constrain

Examples:
Now, how are you going to get yourself out of this inextricable knot you’ve gotten into?, By beginning to tell the truth, her web of lies became an extricable situation., I am buried in paper work and can’t seem to extricate myself from this project., After paying off all his credit cards, he was finally able to extricate himself from a lifelong accumulation of debt.

Tips:
Extricate is derived from the Latin ex-, “free of” + tricae, “trifles, perplexities” Think, free from a perplexing situation.” Use extricate as a more sophisticated way of saying “solve a problem” or “free from burden.” The related adjective extricable refers to something “untangled,” or solved/resolved. The related adjective inextricable describes a problem with no solution or ability to resolve the problem.

Endeavor (noun)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
1. a conscientious activity intended to accomplish something; 2. an effort made in an attempt to achieve something; (verb) to make an effort to achieve something

Antonyms:
cease

Examples:
I have no doubt that our new business endeavor will be a successful one., She endeavored to find a high-paying job right out of college, but the search was more difficult than she had anticipated., Her artistic endeavors landed her in many renowned art galleries., Our company endeavors to provide consistently excellent customer service.

Tips:
Use endeavor as a more sophisticated way of describing an activity you are proud of: “Remodeling our house has been my latest endeavor.” Or use endeavor to describe a valiant attempt to accomplish something: “Despite our best endeavors, we have not been able to locate the girl’s mother.” Finally, as a verb, use endeavor to describe a valiant effort to accomplish or achieve a goal: “We are endeavoring to find a solution to the problem.”

Cringe (verb)

VIEW ANSWER
BACK TO WORD

Definitions:
to experience an inward shiver of embarrassment or disgust OR to bend one’s head and body in fear or in a servile manner.

Examples:
I cringed when I realized what I’d said., When their father came home drunk, the children cringed., I cringed at the sight of my dad dancing., Then there were his cringe-making attempts at humour.

Tips:
Cower and cringe both refer to stooped postures, although cower is usually associated with fearful trembling (: he cowered in the doorway) while cringe is usually linked to servile, cowardly, or fawning behavior (: she cringed before her father’s authority). )