Exasperate (verb)

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Definitions:
To behave in a way so as to belittle or degrade (someone); To lower in character or dignity, to reduce to a lower standing in others’ eyes

Synonyms:
belittle

Examples:
Dunlap had a reputation for openly abasing his employees, I’d rather lose my job than continue to abase myself, Jan was unwilling to abase himself by pleading guilty to a crime that he did not commit

Tips:
Abase suggests groveling or a sense of inferiority and is usually used reflexively (He got down on his knees and abased himself before the king)

Exacerbate (verb)

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Definitions:
To make an already bad or problematic situation worse. To make more violent, severe, bitter.

Synonyms:
compound, heighten, irritate, aggravate, worsen

Antonyms:
appease, mitigate, mollify, assuage

Examples:
Please try to keep down the noise; it’s exacerbating my headache., Some people feel that higher divorce rates will exacerbate teenage behavioral problems., You should probably leave him alone for a while; you’ll only exacerbate his anger if you try to talk to him now., Stress can exacerbate your ulcer, so try to relax and take it easy.

Tips:
To exacerbate a situation is to worsen or irritate it. The word exacerbate is usually used differently than the word exasperate, although they are commonly listed as synonyms. People usually feel exasperated (frustrated, annoyed) and their problems can be exacerbated (made worse). Remember, exasperated has “per,” so think of a person being annoyed or exasperated and an ulcer, “cer,” being made worse or exacerbated by stress.

Prudence (noun)

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Definitions:
1. The quality or fact of being prudent, or wise in practical affairs, as by providing for the future. 2. Caution with regards to practical matters; discretion. 3. Regard for one’s own interest. 4. provident care in the management of resources, ecomony, frugality.

Synonyms:
frugality, diligence, discretion, judgement,vigilance

Antonyms:
carelessness, ignorance, indiscretion,disregard, thoughtlessness

Examples:
He was a friend of Pericles and a man of prudence and moderation. This office he filled with great prudence and probity, removing many abuses in the administration of justice in Egypt. The firm was commended for its financial prudence.

Tips:
contraction of providentia “foresight” (see providence). Secondary sense of “wisdom” (late 14C) now only in jurisprudence.

Muddle (verb)

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Definitions:
muddle through: cope more or less satisfactorily despite lack of expertise, planning, or equipment muddle something up: confuse two or more things with each other Things that are muddled are badly organized. A person who is muddled is confused

Examples:
He left his clothes in a muddled pile in the corner., He became increasingly muddled as he grew older., I don’t think he knows where his career is going – he just muddles along from day to day., If you don’t put pairs of socks together they all get muddled up in the drawer.

Combative (adjective)

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Definitions:
Eager to fight or argue, having to overcome in argument, having or showing a ready disposition to fight.

Synonyms:
argumentative, quarrelsome

Examples:
He made some enemies with his combative style., The prime minister was in a combative mood, twice accusing the opposition of gross incompetence., He displayed a most unpleasant, combative attitude., When you are in a combative mood, you are not pleasant company.

Gambol (verb)

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Definitions:
To run and jump in a happy and playful way. A time or instance of carefree fun. To skip about in play. (noun) The students headed off for one final gambol before the summer recess ended

Examples:
Lambs were gambolling (about/around) in the spring sunshine., The students headed off for one final gambol before the summer recess ended, The mare gamboled toward Connie. Spelling Note: Gombolling or US USUALLY gamboling

Origins:
early 16th cent.: alteration of obsolete gambade, via French from Italian gambata ‘trip up,’ from gamba ‘leg.’

Effervescent (adjective)

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Definitions:
Effervescent is the escape of gas from an aqueous solution and the foaming or fizzing that results from that release. Effervescent can also be observed when opening a bottle of champagne, beer, carbonated beverages, such as soft drinks. The visible bubbles are produced by the escape from solution of the dissolved gas.

Synonyms:
bouncy, bubbly, exuberant,bouncy, airy,frothy, sparkling

Antonyms:
flat, inactive, dull, stale, unenthusiastic

Examples:
Her effervescent personality enlivened the entire room., When she moved, her friends missed the effervescence she had brought to the group with her lively chatter and bubbly personality., The conservative office employees were leery of the temp’s effervescent temperament, but soon became fond of her., I love champagne for its effervescent quality.

Tips:
The verb effervesce can refer to a literal bubbling, such as that which occurs with carbonated beverages like champagne, or the liveliness of a bubbly personality. Effervescent is similar to ebullient as both adjectives refer to bubbles both literally and figuratively. Effervescent is the state of having bubbles, while ebullient is an overflow of bubbles. Use effervescent as a more sophisticated way of saying “bubbly.”

Vivacious (adjective)

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Definitions:
(esp. of a woman) attractively lively and animated.

Synonyms:
buoyand

Examples:
Their vivacious daughter had become moody and morose, He brought along his wife, a vivacious blonde, some twenty years his junior., Judy Garland was bright and vivacious, with a vibrant singing voice., Lisa was a vivacious girl who became a cheerleader, The poem is a vivacious expression of his love for her

Devour (verb)

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Definitions:
To eat something eagerly and in large amounts, so that nothing is left. To destroy something completely, to read books or literature quickly. Devoured by something, To feel an emotion, esp. a bad emotion very strongly so that it strongly influences your behavior

Synonyms:
engulf

Examples:
A series of devastating storms devoured the beach on the south side of the island, The young cubs hungrily devoured the deer., The flames quickly devoured the building., She’s a very keen reader – she devours one book after another., She is driven by a devouring ambition/passion.

Sophomoric (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) Immature, showing the naive lack of judgment that accompanies immaturity. Childish. ; of, relating to, or characteristic of a sophomore

Synonyms:
inexperienced, foolish, reckless

Antonyms:
experienced

Examples:
His sophomoric pranks irked his roommates., Even though she’s a senior, she still hasn’t lost her sophomoric attitude., The movie was a little sophomoric with its slap-stick pratfalls and silly one-liners., His sophomoric political views showed that he wasn’t well-informed, and he based his opinions on naive and juvenile reasoning.

Tips:
Sophomoric describes people who are inexperienced or immature, like the stereotypical sophomore in school. More specifically, it can describe someone who is overly confident in his or her knowledge or intellect.