Accede (verb)

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Definitions:
1. agree or concede to something., 2. to take over a position of authority, especially as a monarch or ruler., 3. to take part in an agreement. To assent or agree to a demand, request, or treaty; assume an office or position.

Synonyms:
consent, agree, concede, assent, accept, acquiesce, yield, submit, endorse, comply

Antonyms:
disagree

Examples:
Dad acceded to Tim’s request to use the car on Saturday night., It was clear that the senator voted “No” on the water bill because he was acceding to pressure from his constituency., I can hardly believe the sway she holds over you; you accede to her every request.

Tips:
Accede is derived from the Latin accedere, “to come to.” Think, come together in agreement. Accede usually refers to yielding or agreeing to another person’s idea or plan after careful deliberation.

Desultory (adjective)

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Definitions:
marked by a lack of plan, regularity or purpose

Synonyms:
disconnected, sporadic, random, erratic

Antonyms:
assiduous, orderly, constant, invariable

Examples:
All of his ideas were desultory and couldn’t possibly form one, cohesive campaign., What started out as a formal business discussion, ended with a desultory conversation characteristic of a cocktail party., She had a hard time focusing on the task at hand due to the desultory thoughts running through her mind., Without a planned agenda, the family’s road trip vacation had them stopping in desultory locations all across the country.

Tips:
Desultory is derived from the Latin desultorius, which literally refers to a circus rider who leaps from horse to horse. Think of leaping from plan to plan or idea to idea, without any plan or purpose.

Origins:
Latin ‘desultorius’ , literally of a circus rider who leaps from horse to horse, from ‘desilire’ to leap down, from de- + salire to leap.

Gist (noun)

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Definitions:
The central idea, the essence, the grounds for action in a suit.

Synonyms:
essence, central theme, nub, marrow, kernel, heart of the matter

Examples:
I didn’t catch every word between them, but heard enough to get the gist of the conversation, That was the gist of what he said., I think I got (= understood) the gist of what she was saying., The gist of her essay is an indictment of the religious right

Origins:
1711, “the real point” (of a law case, etc.), from Anglo-Fr. legalese phrases, especially cest action gist “this action lies,” meaning “this case is sustainable by law,” from O.Fr. gist en “it consists in, it lies in”

Salubrious (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) Favorable to health; promoting health; healthful, OR pleasant

Synonyms:
healthy

Antonyms:
harmful, bad, adverse

Examples:
The journal article mainly discussed the salubrious effects that the vitamins had on those suffering with cancer., I try to exercise everyday as party of my salubrious lifestyle., Many people move to the country because of its salubrious air quality., Broccoli is one of the most salubrious foods you can eat.

Tips:
Salubrious is derived from the Latin salus, which means “welfare, health.” It may be helpful to know that the word salute shares the same origin as salubrious. You may hear people toast glasses and say “salute,” which really means “to your health.” People wish others health or well-being as a salute. The next time you toast glasses say “salute” and wish everyone a salubrious (healthy, nourishing, wholesome) life.

Ennui (noun)

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Definitions:
Boredom from lack of interest, weariness and dissatisfaction with life that results from a loss of interest or sense of excitement. A feeling of boredom and mental tiredness.

Examples:
Some of the children were weary of the ennui of summer vacation and longed to go back to school, while others relished having nothing to do., The ennui of his life eventually drove him to make major changes in his career and living situation., My tedious and uninteresting job held me in a constant state of ennui.

Tips:
Ennui was derived from the Latin expression in odio est, “it is hateful.” The word “annoy” comes from the same source. Ennui is a combination of boredom and dissatisfaction.

Repugnant (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) Offensive an completely unacceptable; extremely distasteful; unacceptable.

Synonyms:
offensive, disgusting, adverse, horrid, revolting, abominable, abhorrent

Antonyms:
nice, tasteful

Examples:
The criminal’s repugnant actions were punished with life in prison., What is artistically expressive to some can be morally and visually repugnant to others., Since I’ve been a vegetarian for many years, the thought of eating a steak or hamburger fills me with repugnance., A repugnant smell came from the moldy food container.

Tips:
If something is disgusting and makes you turn away from it, it is repugnant. Something can be morally repugnant or physically repugnant, as with a bad odor. Physical sensations or unpleasing sights can cause repugnance (aversion) as well.

Complacent (adjective)

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Definitions:
showing smug or uncritical satisfaction with oneself or one’s achievements

Synonyms:
smug, self-pleased, impervious, self-satisfied, apathetic, at ease

Antonyms:
humble, on guard, diffident

Examples:
American auto makers became too complacent in the 1970’s, allowing Japanese manufacturers to increase auto sales in the US., Strong competition keeps companies from becoming too complacent., Don’t become too complacent with the successes you’ve had; you still have a long way to go., After the great revenue year, many of the sales executives became too complacent.

Tips:
Complacent is derived from the Latin complacent, the present participle stem of complacere, literally “to please very much.” It is often used to describe someone who is overly pleased with him or her self. It is also used in business to describe companies that are satisfied with the status quo and may be easing up on marketing, etc.

Irreverent (adjective)

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Definitions:
(adjective) showing a lack of respect for people or things that are generally taken seriously

Synonyms:
disrespectful, scornful, impertinent, flippant, disdainful, disparaging, contemptuous

Antonyms:
respectful, reverent

Examples:
No one was amused by his irreverent joke-telling, The television program takes an irreverent look at the medical profession., Irreverent behavior during church services.

Evanescent (adjective)

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Definitions:
soon passing out of sight, memory, or existence; quickly fading or disappearing

Synonyms:
fleeting, temporal

Antonyms:
enduring, permanent, lasting

Examples:
Rainbows are a beautiful, but unfortunately evanescent, effect of rain and sunshine., Once the evanescent mist had passed, the birds began to chirp happily., Fame can come and go like an evanescent dream., The so called “Brat Pack” of young stars all had short and evanescent careers.

Tips:
Evanescent can be used to describe fleeting joys or passions. In addition, it can be used as a scientific term with waves of light or other such elusive elements. In literature, said of smoke or mist, it denotes gradual fading. Evanescent is related to ephemeral, fleeting, and transitory. See additional analysis at transitory.

Feckless (adjective)

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Definitions:
Lacking purpose or vitality; feeble or ineffective. Careless and irresponsible. Describes people or behavior with no energy; and enthusiasm.

Synonyms:
weak, powerless, lazy, unproductive, aimless

Antonyms:
competent, purposeful, useful, efficient, fecund

Examples:
It was very frustrating to have hired several feckless employees., He was feckless since childhood, so I didn’t have high hopes of him going to college., I remember him being a feckless sloth in high school, so I was surprised to hear he had become successful., I don’t think he has ADD; I just think he’s feckless and doesn’t care about being successful.

Tips:
Feckless is derived from the obsolete feck, “value, efficacy.” If you are feckless, you have “less value, efficacy, and worth.” A feckless person is unlikely to be successful, whether due to irresponsible behavior or just plain lack of drive and gumption.