Apex (noun)

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Definitions:
the top or highest part of something, esp. one forming a point, the top of a shape, the highest point of something, OR the moment of greatest success, expansion, the highest culminating point.

Synonyms:
culmination, pinnacle

Examples:
The living-room extends right up into the apex of the roof., The apex of his career was when he hoisted aloft the World Cup., The central bank is at the apex of the financial system.

Revulsion (noun)

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Definitions:
(Noun) a sense of disgust and loathing.

Synonyms:
disgust, nausea, repugnance, repulsion, horror

Examples:
I turned away in revulsion when they showed a close-up of the operation., She looked at him with revulsion., He expressed his revulsion at/against/towards the whale hunting., Most of us feel only revulsion from such crimes., society’s eventual revulsion from racial segregation, Mark managed to overcome his initial revulsion of lizards and eventually bought one as a pet

Maverick (noun)

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Definitions:
(noun) A person who does not conform to generally accepted standards or customs. An unorthodox or independent-minded person. OR an independent thinker who refuses to conform to the accepted views and does not go along with a group or party. (adjective) independent in one’s thoughts or actions.

Synonyms:
dissident, heretic

Antonyms:
conformist

Examples:
He was a real maverick, shirking many traditional responsibilities in order to do what he wanted with his life., Hugh Hefner was considered a maverick in the publishing industry when he founded Playboy magazine., The shepherd found a maverick lamb that had wandered from its herd, so he took it in with his sheep until he could find out where it came from., The maverick governor refused to pander to his constituents and was not afraid to speak his mind.

Tips:
Maverick is most likely derived from the name of Samuel Maverick, a Texas pioneer famous for not branding his cattle. For a memory trick, think of Tom Cruise’s character in Top Gun, whose nickname was Maverick. He was a true maverick, as he had an independant spirit and often broke rules, which is not something that’s done in the military.

Consecutive (adjective)

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Definitions:
describes events, numbers, etc, that follow one after another without an interruption; following one after the other in order. Six consecutive numbers, such as 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.

Synonyms:
successive, following, continuous

Antonyms:
separate

Examples:
We numbered the papers consecutively., This is the fifth consecutive weekend that I’ve spent working, and I’m a bit fed up with it., We’ve had five consecutive days of rain., The team’s winning streak has lasted for seven consecutive games.

Obliterate (verb)

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Definitions:
To cause to become invisible or indistinct; blot out; To do away completely so as to leave no trace; to wipe out; remove completely; rub off; erase. To annihilate or destroy something totally OR to hide or cover up writing so that it cannot be seen

Examples:
The opposing army was completely obliterated by the new weapon., They tried to obliterate the graffiti left by the vandals, using a fresh coat of paint., Cancer researchers hope to someday obliterate the dreaded disease., The usually beautiful view of the Golden Gate bridge was obliterated by fog this morning.

Tips:
Obliterate comes from obliterare, “to blot out; erase.” For the definition of “complete destruction,” think of something being completely erased from the planet. Obliterate and annihilate are synonymous. To obliterate is to destroy to the point that nothing is left. To annihilate is to destroy to the point that something no longer exists. A bomb can obliterate a town so that nothing of the town exists anymore, while a disease can annihilate the habitants of a town–kills everyone so they no longer exist. Annihilate can also refer to defeating someone convincingly and easily, while obliterate can also refer to erasing something or obscuring something.

Encounter (noun, /, verb)

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Definitions:
unexpectedly experience or be faced with (something difficult or hostile) ; to meet unexpectedly and confront (an adversary)

Synonyms:
brush, confront

Examples:
Frank survived an encounter with the school bully at the local park, Quite unexpectedly encountered our next-door neighbor while vacationing in Europe, We encountered a host of unforeseen problems during the restoration of our 200-year-old house, The troops encountered bands of guerrilla fighters as they made their way across the desert

Origins:
Middle English; formerly also as incounter): from Old French encontrer (verb), encontre (noun).

Genuflect (verb)

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Definitions:
lower one’s body briefly by bending one knee to the ground, typically in worship or as a sign of respect; [with adverbial ] figurative show deference or servility.

Examples:
People were genuflecting in front of the altar., Contemporary Hollywood movies often make subtle genuflections to the great film-makers of the past., She genuflected and crossed herself., People worship capital, adore its aura and they genuflect before Porsches, Politicians had to genuflect to the far left to advance their careers

Origins:
mid 17th cent. (in the sense [bend (the knee)] ): from ecclesiastical Latin genuflectere, from Latin genu ‘knee’ + flectere ‘to bend.’

Deplore (verb)

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Definitions:
feel or express strong condemnation of something.

Synonyms:
abhor, be against, find unacceptable

Antonyms:
admire, applaud

Examples:
One may deplore his unfortunate history and wasted genius, but it is impossible to regret his exclusion from the government of England. If you deplore the environmental practices of the company, you should not purchase their products.

Origins:
Mid 16th century (in the sense weep’ for, regret deeply) from French “deplorer” or Italian “deplorare”, from de- ‘away, thoroughly’ +plorare’ bewail

Faux-pas (noun)

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Definitions:
An embarrassing or tactless act or remark in a social situation.

Synonyms:
blunder, mistake, indiscretion

Antonyms:
manners, proprieties, amenity

Examples:
“I was suddenly sick in the back of their car – it was years before he could confess his faux pas to them” Forget the faux pas of showing up to a constume party in the same costume as someone else.

Tips:
A faux pas is essentially a slip in etiquette or conduct, suggesting indiscretion.

Origins:
Faux pas is a French term which translates to “false step” and means a social blunder leading to embarrassment.

Fortuitous (adjective)

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Definitions:
1. happening by chance, especially as the result of a happy accident; 2. indicating good fortune

Examples:
– Our profits were increased by a fortuitous and unexpected drop in the cost of raw materials. – The early completion of the new hotel proved fortuitous, as several colleges had scheduled their spring breaks for the week of its grand opening. – The unexpected demise of our largest competitor was a fortuitous boon to our quarterly sales. – The unusually hot summer proved fortuitous for the manufacturer of portable air conditioners.

Tips:
Although the original sense of the word fortuitous was “by chance” or “accidental,” it makes sense that it should mean “by happy or lucky chance,” because it originates from the Latin fors, “luck.” Fortuitous is synonymous with serendipitous–both words relate to unforeseen luck or fortune that a person accidentally encounters. Fortuitous is a better adjective, while serendipity is a better noun to use in the context of lucky accidents.