Erroneous (adjective)

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Definitions:
mistaken, incorrect, or containing an error

Synonyms:
wrong, mistaken, incorrect

Antonyms:
correct

Examples:
– The erroneous assumption by John costs the company thousands of dollars. – Lisa’s erroneous planning is to blame for her missed deadline. – Generally, newspapers will retract and apologize for erroneous headlines and statements. – Marc’s erroneous statements caused me a lot of trouble and time proving that he was mistaken.

Tips:
Erroneous is related to the word error. Both words are derived from the Latin errare, to wander, miss.” If someone or something wanders off course, in error, it is erroneous. In business, you may garner more respect referring to an “erroneous transaction,” than to a “mistake” or “mess-up.”

Insipid (adjective)

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Definitions:
Lacking in taste or flavor, lacking in quality, spirit, character

Synonyms:
flavorless, bland, weak, wishy-washy; unappetizing, unpalatable.

Antonyms:
savory, tasty, interesting

Examples:
Her insipid sales presentation had no impact on the client and certainly didn’t raise our bottom line., Even the famous actor couldn’t help the ratings of the insipid TV show., The meal was bland and insipid; a simple pizza would have been more tasty., The insipid dialogue and lack of character development in the movie didn’t give me any reason to care about the outcome of the plot.

Tips:
Insipid is derived from the Latin insipidus, “tasteless.” This meaning of having no flavor has translated beyond food, to anything that seems bland, flat, or uninteresting. For a memory trick, think of the root word sip and how you like to sip and savor something with great taste. Then add the negative in-, “not” and think of something insipid as something you would not like to sip or savor because it has no flavor. Insipid is synonymous with vapid, which means flat and lacking flavor. See additional analysis at vapid. To describe something as insipid is a strong critique. Insipid is related to the word banal. Something insipid is boring because it lacks flavor, spice, and excitement–it’s just dull. Banal describes something boring and dull because it’s been done before and has no originality. See hackneyed for a additional analysis of banal and the related word trite.

Beguile (verb)

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Definitions:
To charm, attract or interest, sometimes in order to deceive:

Examples:
The magician beguiled and amazed the children., He beguiled her into believing that yet another worthless item would enhance her life., Frank was beguiled by the promise of easy money as a drug dealer.

Tips:
While beguile at one time referred exclusively to the use of deception to lead someone astray, nowadays it can also refer to the use of subtle devices to lead someone on (a local festival designed to beguile the tourists).

Amorous (adjective)

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Definitions:
Showing, feeling, or relating to sexual desire

Synonyms:
;, romantic, sexual, amatory, passionate, in love., impassioned, ardent, lustful

Examples:
The film centres around the amorous adventures/exploits of its handsome hero., Amanda had rejected his amorous advances., Male birds engage in amorous behavior–nest-building in order to attract females.

Conspicuous (adjective)

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Definitions:
clear, visible, noticeable

Synonyms:
evident, observable

Antonyms:
hidden, invisible, obscured, unclear

Examples:
He was very thin, with a conspicuous Adam’s apple. (clearly visible) He was uncomfortable about his conspicuous weight gain. (noticeable)

Lethargic (adjective)

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Definitions:
having little energy; feeling unwilling and unable to do anything

Synonyms:
tired, sleepy, lazy, sluggish, drowsy, weak, slow, torpid, inactive

Antonyms:
verve energetic, invigorated, lively

Examples:
I was feeling tired and lethargic.The star player had to be pulled from the game because he seemed too lethargic to help the team. (weak, slow)

He was so lethargic from lack of sleep, it took him two minutes to answer the simple question in class. (sleepy, slow)

Her lethargy caused her to fall asleep during the lecture. (tiredness) noun

I was feeling so lethargic, even after a good night’s sleep, that I went to see my doctor to find out what was wrong. (sluggish, drowsy, tired)

Tips:
Lethargic is derived from the Greek lethargos, which means “forgetful and idle.” A lethargic person may seem forgetful and idle due to a lack of energy. Lethargic is more than being tired; it’s being tired and therefore, not alert, dull minded. Your senses are dull and your ability to react both physically and mentally is impaired or hindered because you are tired. Lethargy is the state of being lethargic.

Ostentatious (adjective)

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Definitions:
characterized by vulgar or pretentious display; designed to impress or attract notice, being showy, conspicuous, or pretentious, usually in an attempt to get others to notice

Synonyms:
showy, garish, gaudy, flamboyant, grandiose, boastful, flashy

Antonyms:
tasteful, unpretentious, understated

Examples:
Of course he was thrilled to have won the competition, but wearing his medal around his neck for the next week was rather ostentatious., The huge, diamond-encrusted Rolex on his wrist isn’t tasteful, it’s ostentatious., She loved to flaunt her ostentatious jewelry and mink coats among her less-wealthy friends., That era was marked by relentless capitalism, widespread corruption, vulgar taste, and ostentatious displays of wealth.

Tips:
Ostentatious is derived from the Latin ostendere, which means “to show or display.” Think, showing something just to impress others. The word ostentatious often carries a connotation of disapproval. The related noun ostentation refers to a vulgar display of wealth, knowledge, or success, especially used to gain the admiration of others. Ostentatious is synonymous with pretentious and pompous.

Treacherous (adjective)

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Definitions:
Unreliable, likely to betray trust, any kind of situation that can backfire on you.

Synonyms:
deceitful, perilous, duplicitous, hazardous, faithless

Antonyms:
loyal, faithful

Examples:
Joanne is a treacherous friend, she’s been known to turn against people in the blink of an eye, Snow and ice have left many roads treacherous, and motorists are warned to drive slowly., Vargas plays the part of treacherous aristocrat who betrays his king and country., Corley said she was standing down as leader because of the treachery of her own colleagues.

Retaliate (verb)

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Definitions:
To return like for like, get revenge

Synonyms:
fight back, react, hit back

Examples:
Frank retaliated his neighbor’s malicious destruction of his flower garden by cutting down the man’s prize apple tree, The demonstrators threw rocks at the police, who retaliated by firing blanks into the crowd., The terrorists retaliated against the government with – a bomb attack, He urged people not to resort to retaliatory violence., The pitcher threw at a couple of our guys and hit one of them, but we didn’t retaliate.

Malicious (adjective)

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Definitions:
characterized by malice; intending or intended to do harm (noun – Malice) a desire to harm or inflict injury on others

Synonyms:
spiteful, malevolent, evil-intentioned, vindictive, vengeful, malign, mean, nasty, hurtful, mischievous,

Antonyms:
benevolent

Examples:
He complained that he’d been receiving malicious telephone calls., There was a girl named Alice, who enjoyed doing malice and inflicted pain on everyone she knew., We’ve had our disagreements in the past, but I bear him no malice; I wish him all the best., His malicious actions hurt too many people to count., I’m so sorry my comments got you fired; I really didn’t intend any malice, There was the class chatterbox once again spreading malicious gossip

Tips:
Malice comes from the Latin word malus, “bad.” The adjective malicious describes something that is intended to harm or upset people. Many “bad” words are derived from the Latin word malus, including malignant, malcontent, malicious, and malevolent. The prefix mal- almost always refers to something bad.